Todd A Carpenter

Todd is the Executive Director of the National Information Standards (NISO). He is focused on facilitating information exchange via standards, technology and business best practices within the US and internationally.
Todd A Carpenter has written 20 posts for The Scholarly Kitchen

How Ink is Made: A Beautiful Reflection of the Analog World we still inhabit

A YouTube Video, How Ink is Made, reminds us of the art and craft that goes into creating the physical products that remain a significant fixture of the publishing world. Continue reading

HighWire Press Moves Out of Stanford and Becomes an Equity-funded “Inc.”

On Friday, Highwire Press announced that it has received a “significant equity investment to support its strategic growth from Accel-KKR” and that it would be spinning off from the Stanford University Library, which has been its home for nearly 20 years. This post explores the implications of the transition. Continue reading

When a Scholar is One Among 500, What Does it Mean to be “An Author”?

Last week, an editorial in Nature highlighted the problem of the proliferating number of authors on papers. Following a 2012 symposium at Harvard University, a small group has proposed a taxonomy of contributor roles that would add details to an author list and have tested that among a group of authors. Scholarly publishers should consider adopting this taxonomy to improve the accuracy and granularity to improve attribution and the assignment of credit. Continue reading

Name identification using the ISNI: An interview with Laura Dawson

As online systems for discovering and distributing content have grown, so too has the need for unambiguous identification of people and the parties exchanging that content. Several systems have been in development in the past couple of years, notably the Open Researcher and Contributor ID (ORCID) and the International Standard Name Identifier (ISNI) system. How these two systems relate, engage each other, and serve community needs isn’t always clear. In hopes of alleviating some of the confusion, I sat down with Laura Dawson from Bowker to discuss the International Standard Name Identifier, how it relates to ORCID, and other issues surrounding identity management systems. Continue reading

On Communicating Science, Technology, Engineering, and Medicine – Alan Alda Talks About Improving Scientific Communication

Alan Alda spoke at the AAAS meeting in Chicago on the theme of communicating science to the public. We often view the communication of science, be it in one’s own scholarly journals or in mass media, as somehow distinct and meaningfully different from other communication styles. However, Alda made the point repeatedly during his presentation that this should not be the case. One can accurately convey science with stories and an engaging style that not only brings the reader along in the discovery process, but also preserves the truth and validity of the underlying discovery. Alda made the point that “Communication is not something you add on to science, it is of the essence of science.” Publishers can help to improve how science is communicated; indeed it is at the core of what publishers bring to the process of distributing science. Continue reading

Stick to Your Ribs: Altmetrics — Replacing the Impact Factor Is Not the Only Point

Revisiting Todd Carpenter’s 2012 post on the value of altmetrics. Continue reading

Merger — The Consolidation Wave Hits Two Publisher Associations

Consolidation among publishers has been a trend for more than 30 years. Mergers may be gargantuan, such as the announcement last fall of Random House and Penguin, or they may be very small. Mergers and acquisitions have taken place across all segments of our industry, from trade publishers, to society publishers, press initiatives, and even … Continue reading

iAnnotate — Whatever Happened to the Web as an Annotation System?

A meeting about annotation services and software shows how new tools may be on the horizon, and reminds us that our audiences are likely to be the heaviest users once these emerge. Continue reading

Splitting the Difference — Does an Editorial Mutiny at a Journal Do Much Long-term Damage?

Editorial boycotts and declarations of independence generate a lot of heat, but what do the data say about the actual success of the new journals compared to the journals that were overthrown. Continue reading

Is It Time for Scholarly Journal Publishers to Begin Distributing Articles Using EPUB 3?

EPUB 3 reveals many smart advances, making EPUB a more viable direction than ever. And with the changing landscape of reading devices and customer preferences, even the vaunted PDF may feel the tremors. Continue reading

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The mission of the Society for Scholarly Publishing (SSP) is "[t]o advance scholarly publishing and communication, and the professional development of its members through education, collaboration, and networking." SSP established The Scholarly Kitchen blog in February 2008 to keep SSP members and interested parties aware of new developments in publishing.
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