Books

This category contains 472 posts

What #ColorOurCollections Suggests

Last week’s surprisingly successful social media campaign was a winning event for libraries, archives, and museums. Continue reading

Bulwarks, Agility, and Foresight

[Editor’s note: This is the edited text of a presentation that Joe Esposito gave as a keynote at the PSP conference in Washington, D.C. on Feb. 3, 2016. The slides for the presentation are embedded at the end of the text. Joe would like to thank John Tagler and Sara Pinto of PSP for their assistance … Continue reading

The Importance of Academic (History) Writing

Historians can and do play a vital role in the public humanities, but there are vital reasons not just why but how we write for one another, too. Continue reading

The Open Syllabus Project, Altmetrics, and a New Dataset

The Open Syllabus Project has created a database of over 1 million college syllabuses and extracted the names of the materials used in these courses. These materials are analyzed quantitatively and ranked. The creators of the service propose a new metric for the evaluation of academic publications. Continue reading

An Interview with Lever Press

An interview with Charles Watkinson, Mike Row, and Mark Edington of the newly-announced Lever Press open access book initiative. Continue reading

Making a Book from Scratch

If you tried to make a book from scratch, how would you do it? Continue reading

The Network Model of Publishing

One of the unanticipated consequences of the introduction of digital media to scholarly publishing is that publishing properties increasingly are organized into networks, with one property pointing to another for the benefit of all. This essay describes the network publishing model and comments on some of a network’s characteristics and economic opportunities. Continue reading

NYPL Shows Academic Libraries What “Public Domain” Means

The New York Public Library has now opened up hundreds of thousands of their digitized public-domain documents to unrestricted access and reuse, encouraging members the general public to exercise all the rights in those documents that the law gives them. Why aren’t more academic libraries doing the same thing? Continue reading

Past, Present and Future: The Book (of Hours)

A centuries old genre of publication — can it inspire tomorrow’s book? Continue reading

Dear Joe: Not-for-profit Publishers in “The Economy”

Robert Harington discusses Joe Esposito’s Scholarly Kitchen article from June 2015, entitled “The Mixed Marriage of For-profit and Not-for-Profit Publishing”, in context of his own experiences in the world of society publishing. Continue reading

For Open Access Monographs, Peter Pays Paul. Who Pays Peter?

Gold open access for monographs is based on the notion that provosts will pay for what librarians will not. This seems like an improbable model for scholarly publishing. Publishing that is not based on end-user demand is not likely to have strong support in lean times. Continue reading

Chefs’ Selections: The Best Books Read During 2015 Part 2

The beginning of the holiday season means it’s time for our annual list of our favorite books read during the year. Today brings Part 2 of the list. Continue reading

Chefs’ Selections: The Best Books Read During 2015 Part 1

The beginning of the holiday season means it’s time for our annual list of our favorite books read during the year. Part 1 today, Part 2 tomorrow. Continue reading

The Death of the Collection and the Necessity of Library-Publisher Collaboration: Young Librarians on the Future of Libraries

Applicants for a recent conference scholarship wrote essays that tended strongly to depict the traditional collection as dead and collaboration between librarians and publishers as essential to the library’s future. Do they herald a generational shift in mindset among librarians? Continue reading

Guest Post: Richard Fisher on The Monograph: Keep On Keepin’ On*, Part Two

In Part Two, Richard Fisher looks at the past, the present and the future of monograph publishing in the humanities and social sciences. Continue reading

Guest Post: Richard Fisher on The Monograph: Keep On Keepin’ On*, Part One

Richard Fisher looks at the past, the present and the future of monograph publishing in the humanities and social sciences. Continue reading

University Presses in Decline…Not so Fast

Alison Mudditt asks a group of experts: what are the unique contributions that university presses make to scholarship and scholarly communication?
Continue reading

Books, Glorious Books: Explorations in Open Access Monograph Publishing

A range of open access (OA) monograph experiments and studies are upon us, or are about to be, and it’s worth taking a look at what we know now and what we can expect to know in the next year or so as a result. OA poses very different challenges and opportunities for journals and … Continue reading

Notes on Publishing in an Emerging Economy

Well-intended government policy in an Eastern European nation is having unexpected results on school publishing, some of which are the precise opposite of what policymakers had hoped for. The problem is that those who draft policy have little imagination about how new programs will be taken up–and altered–in the marketplace. Continue reading

Another Big Win for Google Books (and for Researchers)

Google wins in court (again) as the Second Circuit of Appeals rules that its mass book digitization program qualifies as fair use. But Google is a commercial entity! And their files might get hacked! And their library partners are even more susceptible to copyright pirates than Google is! Yes, said the court, but. . . Continue reading

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The mission of the Society for Scholarly Publishing (SSP) is "[t]o advance scholarly publishing and communication, and the professional development of its members through education, collaboration, and networking." SSP established The Scholarly Kitchen blog in February 2008 to keep SSP members and interested parties aware of new developments in publishing.
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The Scholarly Kitchen is a moderated and independent blog. Opinions on The Scholarly Kitchen are those of the authors. They are not necessarily those held by the Society for Scholarly Publishing nor by their respective employers.
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