Economics

This category contains 271 posts

Open Access in the Humanities and Social Sciences: An Interview with Chris Wickham

As the British Academy releases a new study on Open Access in the Humanities and Social Sciences, I discuss the results with the study’s lead investigator, Chris WIckham. Continue reading

Public Access to Public Books: The Case of the National Trust

The UK’s National Trust owns 140 libraries containing hundreds of thousands of volumes, many of them in the public domain. What would it take to make those books available to the public that owns them? Continue reading

Bitcoin and Flash Traders — Leveraging Scarcity Within the Internet’s Infrastructure

Two ways to leverage scarcity in the computer world are worth examining, because they represent baffling new ways for the rich to get richer. Continue reading

Why Do Publishers Want to Sell Direct?

University presses cite a number of reasons to sell books directly to end-users. The principal reason is to establish a relationship with the customer. But once that relationship has been initiated, what business purpose does it serve? Continue reading

Does Creative Commons Make Sense?

Axiomatically more complicated than copyright, built to provide no legal cover, and possibly put in place by the technocrats in Silicon Valley, does Creative Commons make sense for the creative class? Continue reading

CC-BY, Copyright, and Stolen Advocacy

Even with the protections of traditional copyright, an author may lose control of his original work and see it misappropriated and used for hateful ends. So is it any wonder that many authors have concerns about being required to publish under CC-BY? Continue reading

What Does “Unsustainable” Mean?

We breeze by the statement that “scholarly publishing economics are unsustainable,” without contemplating what it actually means, how deep it goes, and why it has been allowed to get this way. Continue reading

Wellcome Money — In This Example of Open Access Funding, the Matthew Effect Dominates

A surprising set of recipients dominate a list of APC payments released by Wellcome Trust, suggesting that OA is not leading to a reshaping of the industry but perhaps merely driving further consolidation. Continue reading

Everybody Wants a Netflix for Books

There will never be a “Netflix for books” if by that term one means a comprehensive collection. Book aggregations must serve the overarching needs of the publisher to generate revenue and are thus best viewed as simply one channel among many. Continue reading

This One Doesn’t Scale — One Big Reason Why Online Advertising Is Comparatively Limited

Online advertising fails to match print advertising in its scalability, slowing the transition to online for major journals and capping the potential for online subscription prices to be offset in a manner similar to print’s legacy business. Continue reading

Side Dishes by Stewart Wills

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The mission of the Society for Scholarly Publishing (SSP) is "[t]o advance scholarly publishing and communication, and the professional development of its members through education, collaboration, and networking." SSP established The Scholarly Kitchen blog in February 2008 to keep SSP members and interested parties aware of new developments in publishing.
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