This category contains 349 posts

MOOCs Rise from the Ashes

The MOOCs seem to have faded from view. In large part this is because they were so relentlessly overhyped when they first appeared. But now various forms of online education have begun to get traction in the marketplace. An essay by Clay Shirky points out how online education is operating today and its implications for higher education. Continue reading

Ask The Chefs: How Does The Increased Use of Adjunct Faculty Affect Scholarly Publishing?

How does a differentiation between faculty on separate tracks for research or educational roles will drive change in the reward system? How might it impact scholarly publishing? Continue reading

The Death of the Collection and the Necessity of Library-Publisher Collaboration: Young Librarians on the Future of Libraries

Applicants for a recent conference scholarship wrote essays that tended strongly to depict the traditional collection as dead and collaboration between librarians and publishers as essential to the library’s future. Do they herald a generational shift in mindset among librarians? Continue reading

Notes on Publishing in an Emerging Economy

Well-intended government policy in an Eastern European nation is having unexpected results on school publishing, some of which are the precise opposite of what policymakers had hoped for. The problem is that those who draft policy have little imagination about how new programs will be taken up–and altered–in the marketplace. Continue reading

The Impact of Color

A video showing how filmmakers use color to evoke an emotional response from an audience. Continue reading

Back to School

John Oliver’s guide to the upcoming year for students. Continue reading

ORCID Out of the Box

Charlie Rapple reports back from ISMTE, which does not stand for the International Society of Making Toys Educational Continue reading

Meeting in the Middle

Over the last 4 months, I have attended many of the major publishing conferences and have learned quite a bit about the average attendee. I am going to cut to the chase and say that we publishing professionals are missing out on engaging key audiences. I was program co-chair for the STM Society Day back … Continue reading

Science Versus Religion, The God of the Gaps, Being “Less Wrong” and Two Favorite Neils (Gaiman and deGrasse Tyson)

Does religion impinge on scientific progress? And what about leprechauns? Neil Gaiman and Neil deGrasse Tyson discuss… Continue reading

Deceptive Publishing: Why We Need a Blacklist, and Some Suggestions on How to Do It Right

Predatory publishing is a big and complex problem; so is calling out and shaming deceptive publishers by means of blacklisting. Is that something we should even do, and can it be done fairly, constructively, and helpfully? Yes, and here are some suggestions how. Continue reading

You Keep Using That Word, I Do Not Think It Means What You Think It Means

A look at common terms that are improperly used to describe science. Continue reading

Elephants and the Internet: Online Forgetting

Should kids be helped to delete evidence of indiscretion, or should they stop posting such evidence in the first place? Charlie Rapple considers the new iRights campaign Continue reading

Optical Illusions, Legibility and How to Choose the Right Font

An entertaining lecture on the tricks of typography. Continue reading

Advocacy, Analysis, and the Vital Importance of Discriminating Between Them

As the scholarly communication world becomes more complex and the issues we deal with become more politically and emotionally fraught, it becomes increasingly essential that we be able to tell the difference between anlaysis and advocacy. What markers can we look for to help us discriminate between them? Continue reading

The Manuscript Submission Mess: Brief Notes from a Grumpy Author

Submitting articles for publication is a nightmare–there’s a plethora of platforms and interfaces, and they all seem to be awful. Can anything be done? Continue reading

Ask The Chefs: What Did You Learn At This Year’s SSP Annual Meeting?

Last week was the Society for Scholarly Publishing Annual Meeting in Arlington. The Scholarly Kitchen Chefs talk about what they learned at the meeting and how it impacted them. Continue reading

Guest Post: INASP’s Anne Powell — Availability Does Not Equal Access

INASP’s Anne Powell discusses the complexity of discovery, and the work INASP is doing to bring together tools, technologies, infrastructure and perhaps most importantly, relationships built on an understanding of the needs of users. Continue reading

“Super” Outreach from the American Chemical Society

How much would Iron Man’s suit really weigh? This and other pressing questions answered by the American Chemical Society. Continue reading

Stephen Hawking Sings!

Stephen Hawking teams up with the Monty Python troupe to record a new version of their “Galaxy Song”. Continue reading

Guest Post: Emma Brink on Internships: Where Everybody Wins!

Emma Brink discusses her experience as an intern for a publishing house, how to find such a position and how it can help build your career. Continue reading

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The mission of the Society for Scholarly Publishing (SSP) is "[t]o advance scholarly publishing and communication, and the professional development of its members through education, collaboration, and networking." SSP established The Scholarly Kitchen blog in February 2008 to keep SSP members and interested parties aware of new developments in publishing.
The Scholarly Kitchen is a moderated and independent blog. Opinions on The Scholarly Kitchen are those of the authors. They are not necessarily those held by the Society for Scholarly Publishing nor by their respective employers.

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