This category contains 825 posts

What is an Academic Journal?

We spend much time these days wondering when the academic journal as we know it will cease to exist. Robert Harington discusses the role of the journal in light of a fascinating new venture in the field of mathematics – the overlay journal Discrete Analysis. Continue reading

Proof of Concept, Proof of Program, and Proof of Scale in Scholarly Communication

New scholarly-communication initiatives have to do more than just demonstrate proof of concept: they have to demonstrate ongoing sustainability (what we might call “proof of program”) and the ability to create desirable products in the amounts needed (what we might call “proof of scale”). What do these look like when they’re achieved, and how are some recent initiatives doing? Continue reading

Viva VIVO! Thinking More Broadly About the Scholarly Communications Infrastructure

Inspired by this year’s VIVO conference, this post looks at why we need a better understanding of how the scholarly research infrastructure works today in order to keep improving it for the future. Continue reading

Looking to the Future of Narrative

The novelist Iain Pears has produce a book on an interactive app, noting that his work had come up against the limitations of the printed page. What are the implications of experiments in narrative form for other kinds of publishing? Continue reading

Reasons to be Cheerful: Some Thoughts on the SHARE Summer 2015 Meeting

SHARE’s recent summer meeting provided some interesting insights into the organization’s priorities and its ambition to provide a strong, open, and collaborative infrastructure that will maximize the impact of scholarly research. Reasons to be cheerful indeed! Continue reading

Interstitial Publishing

Interstitial publishing, when paired with interstitial reading, is a new form of publishing that aims to take advantage of what previously was viewed as lost time in between primary events during the day. Interstitial publishing seeks ways to create new users by creating content expressly for those brief moments, which heretofore went unexploited for productive aims. Continue reading

Revisiting: Is Access to the Research Paper the Same Thing as Access to the Research “Results”?

Is access to the research paper really the same thing as access to the research results themselves? Are funding agencies creating a false equivalency by confusing the two? And does this confusion favor researchers in some fields over others? Revisiting a 2013 post to re-examine these questions. Continue reading

Scholarly Kitchen Podcast: Ivan Oransky and Retraction Watch

In this episode, Retraction Watch co-founder Ivan Oransky talks with podcast host Michael Clarke about the causes, trends, and problems with retractions of scientific research papers. Continue reading

Summertime and the Reading Is Easy

My nominee for a summer reading book, Mr. Penumbra’s 24-Hour Bookstore. This is a humorous book set in San Francisco. It playfully describes the clash between the new technology and the old world of printed books. Continue reading

Scholarly Kitchen Podcast: “101 Innovations” and Scientific Workflow

Jeroen Bosman and Bianca Kramer, librarians at Utrecht University, talk with podcast host Stewart Wills about their 101 Innovations project. Continue reading

Thinking about Internet Scale

The Internet operates on a scale unlike anything we have seen before. How must publishing adapt to this scale? This requires more than thinking of the Internet as another format. The scale of the Internet requires us to invite machines into our research and publishing activity. Continue reading

Guest Post: Lettie Conrad on Metadata Promiscuity and the Researcher Experience

The pathways into academic material are diverse and the researcher experiences (RX) are quite variable. How can a publisher best open up its content for discovery? Continue reading

How Does the University Press Remain Relevant?

The university press world is ruminating on its relevance in a broader community that does not always show strong report for press activity. Different presses have identified a number of approaches to the problem of increasing relevance. Continue reading

Scholarly Kitchen Podcast: The New Growth Engines

Michael Clarke looks at some of the growth avenues in scholarly communications. Continue reading

The Problem(s) With Credit for Peer Review

Offering researchers credit for performing peer review seems, on the surface, like a good idea. But implementing such a scheme raises some problematic questions. Continue reading

A New Century of Libraries

A whirlwind tour of the fascinating architecture of the modern library. Continue reading

The First Secret of Design

The designer behind the iPod talks about ways to see your product in a new light. Continue reading

Connecting to End-Users

Digital media enables us to collect a huge amount of end-user data, far more than we could gather for print publishing. This presentation summarizes the way that data can be used to foster growth and concludes that end-user data is likely to require the creation of a new class of products. Continue reading

Can We Stop Talking about the “System” of Scholarly Communications, Please?

There are countless proposals for a new “system” for scholarly communications, but such plans are typically top-down and overlook all the creative initiatives by individuals working independently. Continue reading

Guest Post: INASP’s Anne Powell — Availability Does Not Equal Access

INASP’s Anne Powell discusses the complexity of discovery, and the work INASP is doing to bring together tools, technologies, infrastructure and perhaps most importantly, relationships built on an understanding of the needs of users. Continue reading

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The mission of the Society for Scholarly Publishing (SSP) is "[t]o advance scholarly publishing and communication, and the professional development of its members through education, collaboration, and networking." SSP established The Scholarly Kitchen blog in February 2008 to keep SSP members and interested parties aware of new developments in publishing.
The Scholarly Kitchen is a moderated and independent blog. Opinions on The Scholarly Kitchen are those of the authors. They are not necessarily those held by the Society for Scholarly Publishing nor by their respective employers.

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