Historical

This category contains 255 posts

Meet the New Economy of Letters, Same As the Old Economy of Letters

Last fall in the New Yorker, Jill Lapore bemoaned the current relationship between intellectuals and the general public, which she feels is “more vexed than ever” — in part because of a system that rewards academics for outrageousness and for lousy writing. Does she have a point? Continue reading

Well, Blow Me Down — A Tale of Spinach, Citations, Nutrition, Epistemology, and Cognitive Ease

More and more studies are emerging showing how misdirecting and expanding citations can lead to long-term misconceptions and mistaken belief systems in the sciences. Continue reading

Back to the Future with EPIC: The Evolving Personalized Information Construct

In 2004, two journalists imagined the impact of social participation would have on the news media. Continue reading

Stick To Your Ribs: The Impact Factor’s Greatest Hits (and Misses)

Yesterday saw the release of the 2013 Impact Factors for scholarly journals. We present a look back at some favorite posts examining the Impact Factor. Continue reading

How Important Are University Press Books to the Library? One Case Study

How much of the book usage in a research library collection involves books from university presses? Findings from this case study suggests that the answers are complex and, to some degree, suprising. Continue reading

The Importance of Funding Basic Science Research

FASEB’s Stand Up For Science competition winner brings perspective to the question of why we need to fund basic research. Continue reading

2001 (Posts, and counting…)

The Scholarly Kitchen reaches a numerical milestone. Continue reading

Stories of Tech Failure: The PicturePhone

A fascinating look at a failed technology from 1964, and what it might have become. Continue reading

The Journal Redesign — More Complicated, More Costly, and More Strategic Than Ever

Journal redesigns seem to be occurring more frequently — and are certainly more complex — than in the past. What motivates a publisher and editor to undertake a redesign? And why is it so complex, costly, and strategic today? Continue reading

How Important Are Library Sales to the University Press? One Case Study

A study of sales data for 2012 imprints from the University of Chicago Press offers tantalizing hints about the importance (or lack thereof) of library sales to university presses — particularly with regard to scholarly monographs. Continue reading

Side Dishes by Stewart Wills

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The mission of the Society for Scholarly Publishing (SSP) is "[t]o advance scholarly publishing and communication, and the professional development of its members through education, collaboration, and networking." SSP established The Scholarly Kitchen blog in February 2008 to keep SSP members and interested parties aware of new developments in publishing.
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