Marketing

This category contains 310 posts

The Gatekeeper  Strategy in the Library Market

EBSCO is now, through the acquisition of YBP, the largest vendor to academic libraries of both serials and books. This is the beginning of a gatekeeper strategy, which will put EBSCO in a position to mediate a large proportion of the arrangements between publishers and libraries. Continue reading

The Changing Nature of Scale in STM and Scholarly Publishing

Smaller independent and society publishers are finding it increasingly difficult to compete with the economies of scale around production, technology, and (most important) institutional sales that can be brought to bear by a large publisher. If you are a society that has been self-publishing for many decades, such effects may appear as only a recent headwind in a long publishing tradition. This headwind, however, is most likely not a temporary zephyr but rather a permanent fixture of the STM and scholarly publishing landscape, and one that will only increase in intensity. To understand why, it is helpful to look at the two vectors on which scale operates in STM and scholarly publishing: horizontal and vertical. While horizontal scale has long been the province of commercial publishers, society publishers are typically organized to take advantage of vertical scale. The headwinds are presently blowing along the horizontal plane, from the perspective of the society publisher. Continue reading

Deni Auclair Discusses Outsell’s Open Access Report

Rick Anderson interviews Deni Auclair, VP and Lead Analyst for Outsell Inc., about the recently published report “Open Access 2015: Market Size, Share, Forecast, and Trends.” Continue reading

Putting Publishers’ Views of Libraries into Context

A presentation delivered to the International Coalition of Library Consortia, the thesis of which is that libraries and consortia have adopted policies that inadvertently marginalize smaller publishers, to the advantage of the largest publishers. Continue reading

Should We Retire the Term “Predatory Publishing”?

Those who argue that “predatory” behavior is not only a problem among author-pays OA publishers have a good point. But this raises another question: is the term “predatory” itself really useful in the context of scholarly communication? Continue reading

Strip Off, Jump In, Splash Out – How to Swim in Content Marketing Waters

Everybody’s doing content marketing well – except publishers, who too often confuse it with marketing content. Charlie Rapple shares thoughts on getting it right. Continue reading

Maximizing the Impact of Research – An Interview with Deborah Hardoon of Oxfam

Demonstrating the value of scholarly research is increasingly critical to academic success. This interview with Oxfam’s Deborah Hardoon shows that there’s much we can learn from organizations outside of academia about maximizing research impact . Continue reading

Ethnography: A Scientist Discovers the Value of the Social Sciences

What do we mean by ethnographic research? In essence we are talking about a rich, multi-factorial descriptive approach. While quantitative research uses pre-existing categories in its analysis, qualitative research is open to new ways of categorizing data. We take a look at how we can use this technique to delve into the subtleties of online user behavior – a must for publishers and societies involved in new product development Continue reading

Stephen Hawking Sings!

Stephen Hawking teams up with the Monty Python troupe to record a new version of their “Galaxy Song”. Continue reading

The Enduring Mystery of the Academic Book Market

New research on book publishing shows that ebook usage is growing and that the academic and professional segment is maturing, while still growing at a steady pace. Continue reading

Science: Out of the Box, Outreach Done Right

Johns Hopkins University’s science outreach video series offers a compelling way to tell the story of current research to the general public Continue reading

The Ubiquitous Bookstore

There is much discussion now about creating new online bookstores, especially for academic publishers. Some of these discussions, however, are not aligned with overarching trends on the Internet and risk creating something that appears to be out of date the moment it is launched. Continue reading

Guest Post: Karin Wulf on Open Access and Historical Scholarship

As we consider the future of scholarly publishing generally and of open access in particular, we need to keep in mind the deep differences between the humanities and the applied sciences when it comes to both the production and the consumption of scholarship–and the implications of those differences for new dissemination models. Continue reading

More Consolidation in the Publishing Business

Rakuten, the owner of Kobo, has acquired OverDrive, a leading library ebook vendor. The implications of this deal will ripple through the industry and require many players to reevaluate their strategies. Continue reading

SXSW Interactive 2015: More Relevant Than Ever

SXSW Interactive 2015. It may be over but its impact is not. Highlights from SX and reasons why Interactive is beneficial to everyone in publishing and communication. Continue reading

Getting Beyond “Post and Forget” Open Access

Even open access advocates should support the commercialization of materials that are OA, as such commercialization can lead to enhanced discovery of scientific materials. Continue reading

What We Got Wrong About Books

Lack of information about how books are actually used has resulted in a set of actions that don’t make solid economic sense. Now that more end-user information is becoming available, the book business is likely to adjust its practices. Continue reading

Knockoffs Erode Trust in Metrics Market

If the Internet created a burgeoning market of cheap academic journal knockoffs, should we be surprised to witness new knockoff ratings companies? Continue reading

Search Is So 2014

As user expectations on digital experiences change, flat-out “search” is no longer good enough. The up-and-coming users of digital content expect you to know what they want and when they want it, without having to ask for it. These thoughts and more from the recent NFAIS Conference are discussed here. Continue reading

The Context of Scientific Publishing

A presentation to a scientific society on the current environment that STM publishers have to work in. Five issues are identified: regulatory matters, new technology, the structure of the marketplace, competition, and governance. Continue reading

Side Dishes by Stewart Wills

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The mission of the Society for Scholarly Publishing (SSP) is "[t]o advance scholarly publishing and communication, and the professional development of its members through education, collaboration, and networking." SSP established The Scholarly Kitchen blog in February 2008 to keep SSP members and interested parties aware of new developments in publishing.
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