World of Tomorrow

This category contains 989 posts

Amazon and the Future of Work

Amazon was recently criticized harshly in an article in the New York Times. The piece raises the question of whether the hard-charging culture of the tech industry is what we want. Continue reading

Interstitial Publishing

Interstitial publishing, when paired with interstitial reading, is a new form of publishing that aims to take advantage of what previously was viewed as lost time in between primary events during the day. Interstitial publishing seeks ways to create new users by creating content expressly for those brief moments, which heretofore went unexploited for productive aims. Continue reading

A Social World: Society Membership, Social and Economic Rewards and Human Behavior

How do shifts in cultural and economic views on social behavior affect the decision of a student, or researcher when deciding whether or not to join a relevant academic society? What social and economic forces are involved in an academic’s collaborative life, publishing life, and teaching life? Robert Harington delves into a fascinating report from the World Bank, entitled World Development Report 2015: Mind, Society and Behavior and its relevance for publishing and academia. Continue reading

Ask The Chefs: What Is The Future of Membership Organizations? Does Being a Member Still Matter?

Looking to the future, do membership organizations still fit in? How can they maintain and extend their relevance? Continue reading

Scholarly Kitchen Podcast: Ivan Oransky and Retraction Watch

In this episode, Retraction Watch co-founder Ivan Oransky talks with podcast host Michael Clarke about the causes, trends, and problems with retractions of scientific research papers. Continue reading

The Evolution of Language: When is a Phone not a Phone?

What does the word “phone” mean in this day and age? Continue reading

Scholarly Kitchen Podcast: “101 Innovations” and Scientific Workflow

Jeroen Bosman and Bianca Kramer, librarians at Utrecht University, talk with podcast host Stewart Wills about their 101 Innovations project. Continue reading

Thinking about Internet Scale

The Internet operates on a scale unlike anything we have seen before. How must publishing adapt to this scale? This requires more than thinking of the Internet as another format. The scale of the Internet requires us to invite machines into our research and publishing activity. Continue reading

Celebrating Pluto with Stephen Colbert and Neil deGrasse Tyson

Stephen Colbert discusses Pluto with Neil deGrasse Tyson. Continue reading

The Generation Gap: How Society Membership Varies by Age Group

Today’s students and early career researchers and professionals will be critical to the future success of our scholarly societies and associations. How well are they being served at present and how can we ensure their support in future? Continue reading

Ask The Chefs: What Did You Learn At This Year’s SSP Annual Meeting?

Last week was the Society for Scholarly Publishing Annual Meeting in Arlington. The Scholarly Kitchen Chefs talk about what they learned at the meeting and how it impacted them. Continue reading

Connecting to End-Users

Digital media enables us to collect a huge amount of end-user data, far more than we could gather for print publishing. This presentation summarizes the way that data can be used to foster growth and concludes that end-user data is likely to require the creation of a new class of products. Continue reading

An Archaeology of Discovery

How valuable is the brand? It depends on the ecosystem or publishing epoch. Brands were the hallmark of the print era, but with the advent of new publishing paradigms, brands now compete with other useful means to identify materials. Continue reading

Academia Versus Academia.edu: Should Tech Business Needs Trump Scholarly Culture?

Should the fast and loose rules of startup company business models and the spin-oriented language of advertising be given free rein in the scholarly community? Continue reading

Revisiting: On the Likelihood of Academia “Taking Back” Scholarly Publishing

Revisiting Rick Anderson’s 2013 post on what the options for the academy to take control of scholarly publishing, and whether any of those options seems feasible. Continue reading

The Half-life of Print

Popular discussion of the enduring popularity of print often obfuscate the business issues of managing a company that is transitioning from print to digital. Continue reading

Emerging from the STM Meeting: 2015 Top Tech Trends

Each sector of the information community is aware of the likelihood that their role in the scholarly ecosystem will change over the next three to five years. Each sector’s perspective is just a bit different. Content providers in the STM world see the future unfolding this way. Continue reading

Ethnography: A Scientist Discovers the Value of the Social Sciences

What do we mean by ethnographic research? In essence we are talking about a rich, multi-factorial descriptive approach. While quantitative research uses pre-existing categories in its analysis, qualitative research is open to new ways of categorizing data. We take a look at how we can use this technique to delve into the subtleties of online user behavior – a must for publishers and societies involved in new product development Continue reading

The Enduring Mystery of the Academic Book Market

New research on book publishing shows that ebook usage is growing and that the academic and professional segment is maturing, while still growing at a steady pace. Continue reading

5 Million Public Domain Ebooks in HathiTrust: What Does This Mean?

The HathiTrust archive now contains 5 million digitized books that are in the public domain and are freely available to all. Do we recognize how significant that is? Continue reading

Side Dishes by Stewart Wills

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The mission of the Society for Scholarly Publishing (SSP) is "[t]o advance scholarly publishing and communication, and the professional development of its members through education, collaboration, and networking." SSP established The Scholarly Kitchen blog in February 2008 to keep SSP members and interested parties aware of new developments in publishing.
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The Scholarly Kitchen is a moderated and independent blog. Opinions on The Scholarly Kitchen are those of the authors. They are not necessarily those held by the Society for Scholarly Publishing nor by their respective employers.
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