This tag is associated with 31 posts

Seven Things Every Researcher Should Know About Scholarly Publishing

After many and long conversations among colleagues within and beyond the Scholarly Kitchen
about what researchers need to know about scholarly publishing, Alice Meadows and Karin Wulf compiled a list of what we think to be the most urgent issues.
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Interview with an Empire: Tim Collins, CEO of EBSCO Industries

Robert Harington asks Tim Collins for his views on publishing industry trends seen through the prism of his leadership role at EBSCO, exploring Tim’s sense of a connected world of stakeholders in today’s publishing industry. Continue reading

The Open Syllabus Project, Altmetrics, and a New Dataset

The Open Syllabus Project has created a database of over 1 million college syllabuses and extracted the names of the materials used in these courses. These materials are analyzed quantitatively and ranked. The creators of the service propose a new metric for the evaluation of academic publications. Continue reading

Mr. Market is a Brilliant Editor

Of the many ways to measure the quality of a publication, one that is often overlooked are the workings of the marketplace itself. Purchases for published material is made in large part on the basis of the quality of that material, making the marketplace something of an editor of genius. This mechanism incorporates all other metrics, from impact factor to altmetrics. Unfortunately, the marketplace is not free to exercise its judgment when many participants seek dominant and even monopolistic control. Continue reading

Celebrating Five Years of Altmetrics

Charlie Rapple reports on the 2:AM conference, which celebrated five years of altmetrics and considered what we should aspire to achieve in the next five years Continue reading

Altmetrics and Research Assessment: How Not to Let History Repeat Itself

Criticisms of altmetrics often seem to be equally applicable to other forms of research assessment, like the Impact Factor. Phill Jones suggests that is not because of a fundamental opposition to altmetrics but a fear that it will suffer the same pitfalls. The solution is to engage more with a somewhat neglected set of stakeholders; Informaticians. Continue reading

If We don’t Know What Citations Mean, What Does it Mean when We Count Them?

There is no shortage of critique of citation metrics and other efforts to quantify the “impact” of scholarship. Will a report calling for “responsible metrics” help researchers, administrators and funders finally wean themselves? Continue reading

Surveillance and the Scholarly World: What Shall We Do With The Database of Intentions?

When we talk about impact and metrics and understanding the customer, we are actually talking about surveillance data. We should have an open debate about what this means. Continue reading

Outliers and the Importance of Anonymity: Usage Data Versus Snooping on Your Customers

Late last year, Nature Publishing Group embarked on an experiment to allow users to share content. Some commentators accused NPG of using controlled sharing to snoop on customers. In this post, Phill Jones explores the difference between aggregated usage data and spying on users. Continue reading

Altmetric’s Top 100: What Does It All Mean?

Altmetric’s annual top 100 list provides an opportunity to see what science reached the general public and to think more about what information altmetrics really provide. Continue reading

Guest Post: Phill Jones on The Changing Role of the Postdoc and Why Publishers Should Care

Guest Chef Phill Jones takes a look at an often under-recognized population of researchers and suggests why publishers should give them more attention. Continue reading

Going to the Beach with a Public Intellectual

This year’s beach reading will be spent with books by public intellectuals. Unfortunately, writing for the general public is not valued within the academy, to the detriment of public education. Continue reading

Interview with Thomson Reuters: InCites Platform Offers New Analytics and Transparency

Thomson Reuters launched a new platform called InCites last week. The platform combines Journal Citation Reports with the Essential Science Indicators. In this Q&A, Patricia Brennan from Thomson Reuters describes the new platform and new additions that answer concerns from critics. Continue reading

NISO Vets Research on Altmetrics

NISO has released the results of their year long study of Altmetrics in draft form for comment. Continue reading

Altmetrics: Mistaking the Means for the End

Should attention metrics play any role whatsoever in researcher assessment? Continue reading

When a Scholar is One Among 500, What Does it Mean to be “An Author”?

Last week, an editorial in Nature highlighted the problem of the proliferating number of authors on papers. Following a 2012 symposium at Harvard University, a small group has proposed a taxonomy of contributor roles that would add details to an author list and have tested that among a group of authors. Scholarly publishers should consider adopting this taxonomy to improve the accuracy and granularity to improve attribution and the assignment of credit. Continue reading

The Measurement of the Thing: Thinking About Metrics, Altmetrics and How to Beat Goodhart’s Law

Can machine readable articles, built on author/editor/publisher curated declarative statements and the associated data (or links thereto), be a way of generating metrics that get us nearer to a ‘standard candle’ of scientific research output? Continue reading

Altmetrics Boosted by EBSCO’s Acquisition of Plum Analytics

EBSCO has recently acquired altmetrics startup Plum Analytics. What will this mean for both companies and altmetrics in general? Continue reading

Stick to Your Ribs: Altmetrics — Replacing the Impact Factor Is Not the Only Point

Revisiting Todd Carpenter’s 2012 post on the value of altmetrics. Continue reading

Scholarly Kitchen Podcast: Standards, Standards, Standards

Scholarly Kitchen chef Todd Carpenter discusses technical standards in today’s scholarly-publishing landscape, and what’s on the horizon. Continue reading

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The mission of the Society for Scholarly Publishing (SSP) is "[t]o advance scholarly publishing and communication, and the professional development of its members through education, collaboration, and networking." SSP established The Scholarly Kitchen blog in February 2008 to keep SSP members and interested parties aware of new developments in publishing.
The Scholarly Kitchen is a moderated and independent blog. Opinions on The Scholarly Kitchen are those of the authors. They are not necessarily those held by the Society for Scholarly Publishing nor by their respective employers.