Alice Meadows

I am Director of Communications for ORCID (, a community-led nonprofit organization that aims to solve the name ambiguity problem in research and scholarly communications. I previously held a range of marketing roles for Wiley and, before that, Blackwell (US and UK) including, most recently, as Director of Communication. I was also a founding partner in a small UK business offering marketing services to scholarly and STM publishers. Note: The opinions expressed here are my own and do not necessarily represent those of my employer.
Alice Meadows has written 38 posts for The Scholarly Kitchen

Crossing Boundaries in Scholarly Communication

The theme for SSP’s 2016 conference is Crossing Boundaries: New Horizons in Scholarly Communication. Here are some thoughts on a few of the boundaries that need to be crossed, not just at conferences but also in our community more generally. Continue reading

Welcome to Peer Review Week!

Welcome to the first – but hopefully not the last – Peer Review Week: an opportunity to celebrate the fundamental role played by peer review in scholarly communications, and the many diverse efforts to improve and support it. Continue reading

Viva VIVO! Thinking More Broadly About the Scholarly Communications Infrastructure

Inspired by this year’s VIVO conference, this post looks at why we need a better understanding of how the scholarly research infrastructure works today in order to keep improving it for the future. Continue reading

Peer Review Week – A Celebration!

Peer review is fundamental to scholarly communications – not just journal articles, but conference papers, grants, promotion and tenure, and more. Four organizations plan to honor it through a Peer Review Week later this month – we hope you’ll join the celebrations! Continue reading

Reasons to be Cheerful: Some Thoughts on the SHARE Summer 2015 Meeting

SHARE’s recent summer meeting provided some interesting insights into the organization’s priorities and its ambition to provide a strong, open, and collaborative infrastructure that will maximize the impact of scholarly research. Reasons to be cheerful indeed! Continue reading

Words of Wisdom: Advice for our Younger Selves from Six Women in Publishing

The conversation about the lack of gender diversity at the top of scholarly publishing is gathering pace, and was the topic of several sessions at this year’s SSP conference. This post compiles some of the advice given by women at different stages of their publishing career to attendees at one of those sessions. Continue reading

The Generation Gap: How Society Membership Varies by Age Group

Today’s students and early career researchers and professionals will be critical to the future success of our scholarly societies and associations. How well are they being served at present and how can we ensure their support in future? Continue reading

Challenges, Connections, Conversations, and Collaboration – Lessons from the May 2015 ORCID-CASRAI Conference

The recent ORCID-CASRAI conference in Barcelona brought together over 150 researchers, research administrators, funders, publishers, vendors, and others working in scholarly communications to discuss research evaluation, with a particular focus on social science and humanities – resulting in some interesting conversations and observations Continue reading

Maximizing the Impact of Research – An Interview with Deborah Hardoon of Oxfam

Demonstrating the value of scholarly research is increasingly critical to academic success. This interview with Oxfam’s Deborah Hardoon shows that there’s much we can learn from organizations outside of academia about maximizing research impact . Continue reading

Tell Us What You Want, What You Really Really Want – First Results from a New Survey on Scholarly Society Membership

Results from a new survey – one of the largest of its kind – shed light on why people choose to belong to scholarly societies. And why they don’t… Continue reading

Advancing Research Communication & Scholarship – An Interview with Robin Champieux and Jill Emery about this New Conference

April sees the first Advancing Research Communication & Scholarship conference, described by the organizers as providing a “broad and collaborative forum for addressing and affecting scholarly and scientific communication. Find out more about this new meeting in our interview with two ARCS 2015 Board members, Robin Champieux and Jill Emery Continue reading

Flipping, not Flopping: Converting Subscription Journals to Open Access

In an increasingly open world, should more subscription journals be converted to OA? And if so, why, how, and when? Continue reading

Article Sharing on Scholarly Collaboration Networks – An Interview with Fred Dylla about STM’s Draft Guidelines and Consultation

The International Association of Scientific, Technical and Medical Publishers recently launched a consultation, requesting feedback from all stakeholders about their draft principles on article sharing on scholarly communication networks. Find out more about how and why these principles are needed and what the consultation hopes to achieve, n this interview with Fred Dylla, Executive Director and CEO of the American Institute of Physics, and project lead for the initiative. Continue reading

Peer Review — Recognition Wanted!

Despite recent criticisms, peer review remains central to scholarly communication – but identifying and maintaining a steady stream of trained and knowledgeable peer reviewers is increasingly challenging. With researchers under more pressure than ever to publish or perish, some journal editors would like to see more support and recognition for peer review from their institutions and funders. Continue reading

To Share or not to Share? That is the (Research Data) Question…

With increased pressure from funding bodies and others for researchers to make their data open, as well as their research articles, it’s important to understand who is already sharing what data, how, why – and why not… Continue reading

An Interview with Amy Brand on a Proposed New Contributor Taxonomy Initiative

We’ve got DOIs (digital object identifiers) to help identify research articles, images, and other digital objects, and ORCIDs (Open Researcher and Contributor IDs) to help disambiguate the authors of those objects. Now there’s a new initiative to create a contributor taxonomy that identifies who’s done what in the creation of published research – find out more in our interview with Amy Brand, one of the brains behind the concept. Continue reading

Public Access: Getting More Research to More People

Despite the increase in open access publishing, public access initiatives like Research4Life, INASP, the UK’s Access2Research pilot, and more are still playing a valuable role in making research publications more widely available, both to researchers outside of the developed world, and to the general public. Continue reading

What Societies Really Think About Open Access

What do societies really think about Open Access? A recent survey, though small, provides some initial answers… Continue reading

How Can We Make the Publishing Process More Sound?

At a time when more research articles are more readily available to more readers globally than ever before, it’s crucial we are confident that those papers meet the highest standards and, that on those occasions where they don’t, there is a sound system in place to revise or retract them. So what can we do to make the publishing process more sound?
Continue reading

The Next Big Things?

Privacy, trust and managing the cultural record bubble to the surface of growing concerns. Continue reading

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The mission of the Society for Scholarly Publishing (SSP) is "[t]o advance scholarly publishing and communication, and the professional development of its members through education, collaboration, and networking." SSP established The Scholarly Kitchen blog in February 2008 to keep SSP members and interested parties aware of new developments in publishing.
The Scholarly Kitchen is a moderated and independent blog. Opinions on The Scholarly Kitchen are those of the authors. They are not necessarily those held by the Society for Scholarly Publishing nor by their respective employers.

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