David Crotty

I am the Editorial Director, Journals Policy for Oxford University Press. I oversee journal policy and contribute to strategy across OUP’s journals program, drive technological innovation, serve as an information officer, and manage a suite of research society-owned journals. I was previously an Executive Editor with Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press, creating and editing new science books and journals, and was the Editor in Chief for Cold Spring Harbor Protocols. I received my Ph.D. in Genetics from Columbia University and did developmental neuroscience research at Caltech before moving from the bench to publishing. I have been elected to the STM Association Board and serve on the interim Board of Directors for CHOR Inc., a not-for-profit public-private partnership to increase public access to research.
David Crotty has written 267 posts for The Scholarly Kitchen

When Bad Science Wins, or “I’ll See It When I Believe It”

Observational studies claiming an open access citation advantage just keep coming, despite problems in reproducibility and a lack of adequate controls. Are we in for a similar literature on the subject of the impact of social media on readership and citation? Continue reading

Words That Aren’t As Related As They Might Seem

Some etymological fun — English words that seem like they should be related but aren’t. Continue reading

The Size of Things, Local Edition: Why Maps Are Wrong

Last Friday’s post looked at visualizations for the relative sizes of celestial objects. But for most of us, a Blue Supergiant Star remains something of an abstract concept. This week, a look closer to home. Continue reading

A Quick Tour Around the World of Scholarly Journal Publishing

A presentation to the 2016 ISMTE US Conference. Something of a “state of our industry” overview, or perhaps, everything I needed to know I learned from the other bloggers at The Scholarly Kitchen. Continue reading

The Size of Things (and the Power of a Consistent Frame of Reference)

How does a new visualization of the size of the universe stack up to the classic standard? Continue reading

The Pay It Forward Project: Confirming What We Already Knew About Open Access

A new study from the University of California system confirms much of what we already knew about open access, particularly the increased financial burden it places on productive universities. Continue reading

Coming Soon: Battles Over Academic Privacy — But Is This Fight Already Over?

How much is the privacy of academics worth? Judging by the behavior of most people, seemingly very little. Continue reading

In Search Of Gutenberg

Stephen Fry presents a journey through Gutenberg’s life and the invention of his “machine that shaped civilization.” Continue reading

Why Animals Are Needed In Research

Leading researchers explain the critical need for animal research models. Continue reading

An Introduction to Uncle Charlie: NIST Research that Proved Baseballs Really Curve

A look back at NIST research into an important summer question. Continue reading

Gone Fishing: Off for the 4th of July

Summertime, and we’re off for the 4th of July. Some suggested listening and reading for the break. Continue reading

Margaret Ann Armour at SSP 2016, Crossing Boundaries: Encouraging Diversity

Dr. Margaret Ann Armour’s keynote on diversity in academia and publishing, from the SSP’s 2016 Annual Meeting. Continue reading

Paying for Compliance: A Potential Path Forward for Institutional Repositories

A pilot between Elsevier and the University of Florida suggests solutions for long-running failings of institutional repositories. Continue reading

The Medium Is The Message, Especially for TED Talks

A breakdown of the mechanics of the TED Talk. Continue reading

Why Knowledge for The Pure Sake of Knowing is Good Enough to Justify Scientific Research

Duke University’s Sheila Patek makes an elegant argument in favor of funding basic research. Continue reading

On Comment Moderation (or, Why Has My Manifesto Disappeared Into the Ether?)

Let’s talk about the comment moderation policy at The Scholarly Kitchen. Continue reading

The Partnership Between Q and U

More language nerdery, probing the origins of the pairing of the letters Q and U in English. Continue reading

1,500 Water Balloons on a Trampoline

Springtime finally arrives, so why not celebrate with some slow motion footage of water balloons on a trampoline? Continue reading

Science Credibility: The Media’s Role

John Oliver offers a scathing look at the poor practices of media in scientific reporting. Continue reading

Science Credibility: A Public Service Announcement

Jimmy Kimmel presents a video on climate change, and wonders why the public is so resistant to scientific consensus. Continue reading

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The mission of the Society for Scholarly Publishing (SSP) is "[t]o advance scholarly publishing and communication, and the professional development of its members through education, collaboration, and networking." SSP established The Scholarly Kitchen blog in February 2008 to keep SSP members and interested parties aware of new developments in publishing.
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The Scholarly Kitchen is a moderated and independent blog. Opinions on The Scholarly Kitchen are those of the authors. They are not necessarily those held by the Society for Scholarly Publishing nor by their respective employers.
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