Academic publishing

This tag is associated with 164 posts

The 1% of Scientific Outputs — A Story of Strawmen, Sensationalism, and Scopus

A paper claiming to have identified “the 1%” in productive published researchers may suffer from problems with disambiguation, timing, and scope. Continue reading

Technology and Digital Scholarship

An overview of new tools available, to help us consider how publishing may better incorporate technology in the context of a connected society. Continue reading

Trust But Verify — Identity Fraud and Exploitation of the Trust Economy in Scholarly Publishing

A ruse to self-review and self-recommend papers for publication leads to 60 retractions. Can we find a way to prevent this kind of identity fraud and its consequences? Continue reading

Hit the Road — How a Forgettable Paper and a Misguided Publisher Created an Unnecessary Controversy

The censorship scandal at Taylor & Francis has wrapped up, and the lessons are as obvious as you think. Continue reading

Author vs. Author: The Authors Guild and the Authors Alliance Set to Duke It Out?

The emergence of the Authors Alliance is causing consternation among some members of the traditional publishing community, most notably the Authors Guild, which has already issued a sharply-worded critique. But what is the Alliance actually going to do? They’re not really saying. Continue reading

Open Access: Fundamentals to Fundamentalists

There is a certain fundamentalism that pervades discussions around open access policies and business models. On the one hand there are the advocates, and through the laws of conservation of energy, the equal and opposite reaction of anti-open access advocacy. There seems little room for rational debate about open access in the midst of such an antagonistic atmosphere.This post asks us to spend our time thinking through a range of open access models, experimenting and refining, rather than forcing ourselves down the road of policy mandates that potentially discourage innovation. Continue reading

Identity Theft of the Scholarly Kind

Building a reputation can take decades for a society, publisher or journal. Unfortunately, the influential “seals of approval” in the industry are easy to spoof leaving some authors confused and deceived. Continue reading

Keeping It Real — Ethics and Privacy as the Frontiers “Recursive Fury” Case Continues to Churn

Frontiers issues another statement about why the “Recursive Fury” paper was retracted, raising once again questions about why it was retracted, but shifting the focus more and more to how it was retracted. Continue reading

Left Behind—Will Proposed Rules in Scholarly Publishing Leave Behind a Population of Researchers?

Lost in the discussions of what open access, open data and public access should look like are the concerns of researchers who are not yet on board with what is being proposed. Continue reading

The Next Big Things?

Privacy, trust and managing the cultural record bubble to the surface of growing concerns. Continue reading

Side Dishes by Stewart Wills

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The mission of the Society for Scholarly Publishing (SSP) is "[t]o advance scholarly publishing and communication, and the professional development of its members through education, collaboration, and networking." SSP established The Scholarly Kitchen blog in February 2008 to keep SSP members and interested parties aware of new developments in publishing.
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The Scholarly Kitchen is a moderated and independent blog. Opinions on The Scholarly Kitchen are those of the authors. They are not necessarily those held by the Society for Scholarly Publishing nor by their respective employers.
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