Academic publishing

This tag is associated with 197 posts

Meeting in the Middle

Over the last 4 months, I have attended many of the major publishing conferences and have learned quite a bit about the average attendee. I am going to cut to the chase and say that we publishing professionals are missing out on engaging key audiences. I was program co-chair for the STM Society Day back … Continue reading

A Social World: Society Membership, Social and Economic Rewards and Human Behavior

How do shifts in cultural and economic views on social behavior affect the decision of a student, or researcher when deciding whether or not to join a relevant academic society? What social and economic forces are involved in an academic’s collaborative life, publishing life, and teaching life? Robert Harington delves into a fascinating report from the World Bank, entitled World Development Report 2015: Mind, Society and Behavior and its relevance for publishing and academia. Continue reading

Ask The Chefs: What Is The Future of Membership Organizations? Does Being a Member Still Matter?

Looking to the future, do membership organizations still fit in? How can they maintain and extend their relevance? Continue reading

Scholarly Kitchen Podcast: Ivan Oransky and Retraction Watch

In this episode, Retraction Watch co-founder Ivan Oransky talks with podcast host Michael Clarke about the causes, trends, and problems with retractions of scientific research papers. Continue reading

Scholarly Kitchen Podcast: “101 Innovations” and Scientific Workflow

Jeroen Bosman and Bianca Kramer, librarians at Utrecht University, talk with podcast host Stewart Wills about their 101 Innovations project. Continue reading

Scholarly Kitchen Podcast: Talking Publication Ethics

A conversation with COPE’s Charlotte Haug. Continue reading

Scholarly Kitchen Podcast: The New Growth Engines

Michael Clarke looks at some of the growth avenues in scholarly communications. Continue reading

Gender Diversity: We Can Do Better

It is time to reframe the gender diversity issue. Women are underrepresented in leadership and yet make better leaders. Robert Harington writes that it is up to all of us in leadership positions to tip the scales of diversity towards inclusion and balance. Continue reading

Revisiting: On the Likelihood of Academia “Taking Back” Scholarly Publishing

Revisiting Rick Anderson’s 2013 post on what the options for the academy to take control of scholarly publishing, and whether any of those options seems feasible. Continue reading

Sexism in Peer Review

When sexist comments make it into a technical review of a research article, journal editors and publishers are wise to take a moment and think about processes for finding, responding to, and eradicating this behavior. Continue reading

Strip Off, Jump In, Splash Out – How to Swim in Content Marketing Waters

Everybody’s doing content marketing well – except publishers, who too often confuse it with marketing content. Charlie Rapple shares thoughts on getting it right. Continue reading

Emerging from the STM Meeting: 2015 Top Tech Trends

Each sector of the information community is aware of the likelihood that their role in the scholarly ecosystem will change over the next three to five years. Each sector’s perspective is just a bit different. Content providers in the STM world see the future unfolding this way. Continue reading

Ethnography: A Scientist Discovers the Value of the Social Sciences

What do we mean by ethnographic research? In essence we are talking about a rich, multi-factorial descriptive approach. While quantitative research uses pre-existing categories in its analysis, qualitative research is open to new ways of categorizing data. We take a look at how we can use this technique to delve into the subtleties of online user behavior – a must for publishers and societies involved in new product development Continue reading

Guest Post: Bryn Geffert On Securing Rights

Guest Chef Bryn Geffert (Librarian of the College at Amherst College) tries to envision a world in which publishers can spend less time and money wrestling with copyright issues and scholars can more effectively share their work. Continue reading

Ask The Chefs: How Should a Scholarly Publisher Integrate Their Books and Journals Programs?

Do publishers need to integrate the creation, management, delivery, and discovery of different content types? What best meets customer needs, optimizes resources, and encourages innovative new content products and services? Continue reading

Walk Like an Egyptian: A Conversation with Nigel Fletcher Jones, Director of the American University in Cairo Press

As North American university presses struggle with identity, and seek to redefine their place in the publishing ecosystem, it is worth exploring the activities, and outlook of the American University in Cairo Press through the eyes of its Director, Nigel Fletcher Jones. What can we learn from this publisher, who has ambition, optimism, and a recent track record of significant growth? Continue reading

Conveying Understanding: That Grumpy Essay in the New York Times

Technology is great, but does it deserve top billing? Leon Wieseltier’s essay in the New York Times as well as articles by other academics raise a challenge to the information industry as a whole. Continue reading

Going APE — Thoughts and Insights with a European Perspective

The Academic Publishing in Europe (APE) meeting in Europe is 10 years old, but feels as fresh and frisky as some of the meetings in the US used to. This report touches on some of the most interesting threads of two days’ worth of interesting presentations and conversations. Continue reading

University of California Press Introduces New Open Access Publishing Programs

The University of California Press has announced two new open access publishing initiatives, one a monographs program and the other an OA mega journal. Here UCP director Alison Mudditt answers some questions posed by the Kitchen about these new initiatives. Continue reading

Doing Better With Open Access Advocacy

When thinking about open access to content, is it appropriate to equate disabling downloads with lack of support for the visually impaired? Continue reading

Side Dishes by Stewart Wills

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The mission of the Society for Scholarly Publishing (SSP) is "[t]o advance scholarly publishing and communication, and the professional development of its members through education, collaboration, and networking." SSP established The Scholarly Kitchen blog in February 2008 to keep SSP members and interested parties aware of new developments in publishing.
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The Scholarly Kitchen is a moderated and independent blog. Opinions on The Scholarly Kitchen are those of the authors. They are not necessarily those held by the Society for Scholarly Publishing nor by their respective employers.
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