Business model

This tag is associated with 70 posts

The Changing Nature of Scale in STM and Scholarly Publishing

Smaller independent and society publishers are finding it increasingly difficult to compete with the economies of scale around production, technology, and (most important) institutional sales that can be brought to bear by a large publisher. If you are a society that has been self-publishing for many decades, such effects may appear as only a recent headwind in a long publishing tradition. This headwind, however, is most likely not a temporary zephyr but rather a permanent fixture of the STM and scholarly publishing landscape, and one that will only increase in intensity. To understand why, it is helpful to look at the two vectors on which scale operates in STM and scholarly publishing: horizontal and vertical. While horizontal scale has long been the province of commercial publishers, society publishers are typically organized to take advantage of vertical scale. The headwinds are presently blowing along the horizontal plane, from the perspective of the society publisher. Continue reading

Scholarly Kitchen Podcast: The New Growth Engines

Michael Clarke looks at some of the growth avenues in scholarly communications. Continue reading

Flipping, not Flopping: Converting Subscription Journals to Open Access

In an increasingly open world, should more subscription journals be converted to OA? And if so, why, how, and when? Continue reading

Central Casting — The Funding Problems We’re Baking Into the Future of Scholarly Publishing

As we drift into a scholarly economy with centralized payment mechanisms and greater dependence on government funding, are we truly setting ourselves up for long-term independence and success? Continue reading

Interview with Laurel Haak of ORCID: Supporting the Efforts with Membership and Integration

As ORCID comes close to reaching it’s goals for registrations, the organization is not yet financially stable. Laurel Haak, executive director of ORCID, answers questions about where they are at and what is coming for users and members. Continue reading

Stick To Your Ribs: Ask the Chefs: “Are We a Service Industry Or a Product Industry?”

Revisiting a 2012 post to ask, do journal authors really give their articles away for free to publishers? Continue reading

Scholarly Kitchen Podcast: If It Isn’t Disruption, What Is It?

Three Scholarly Kitchen chefs talk about the uses and misuses of the term “disruption” in describing what’s going on in the scholarly publishing market. Continue reading

Scholarly Kitchen Podcast: Peter Binfield on PeerJ

Peter Binfield talks about progress at PeerJ since the innovative OA journal’s launch, and where the journal is headed. Continue reading

Scholarly Kitchen Podcast: Mitch Joel on Rebooting Your Business, and Your Life

Mitch Joel talks about how to survive and thrive in the current era of technology-driven change. Continue reading

Scholarly Kitchen Podcast: Jeffrey Beall on “Predatory Open Access”

Librarian Jeffrey Beall talks about his list of predatory open access journals, the potential pitfalls of article-level metrics, and more. Continue reading

Scholarly Kitchen Podcast: Anita de Waard on the Semantic Web, Data, and Discovery

An expert on the semantic Web, structured markup, and the emerging area of research data services talks about the current state of play. Continue reading

Businessman Closes Product, Community Enraged! The Death of Tools of Change

When a popular and iconic product is ended, the outrage doesn’t match the pragmatism and agility we all espouse. TOC’s end is one such example. Continue reading

Gold for Gold — Royal Society of Chemistry Uses OA as Incentive to Sell “Big Deal” Site Licenses

A clever way to sell institutional site licenses and Gold OA together helps one publisher find the fulcrum amidst uncertainty. Continue reading

Licensing Controversy — Balancing Author Rights with Societal Good

The CC-BY license is assumed to be an open access standard, but the situation is complex — for funders, authors, universities, and publishers of all types. Perhaps a less dogmatic approach would serve all parties better. Continue reading

Mendeley, Connotea, and the Perils of Free Services

Free services and open access are distorting the publishing world. Will the big only get bigger? Continue reading

How Valuable Is PubMed Central’s Early Publication of eLife Content?

What is the likely value of what PubMed Central is providing to eLife by publishing them free online, providing PubMed indexing without delay, and getting them into the market six months early? Continue reading

CC-Huh? Fundamental Confusions About the Role of Copyright and the Reuse of Data

A fundamental confusion between articles and data leads to a call for more CC licenses and less copyright. But why are data being closed down while articles are being opened up? Is there a fundamental misunderstanding of copyright, licensing, and rights? Continue reading

Are Open Access Initiatives “Catastrophic” for Commercial Publishers?

An analyst frets that Elsevier might suffer from the trends in OA publishing and its mandates. But there’s no logical or practical reason to believe this. Continue reading

Driving Innovation: Finding the Balance Between Fair Reward and Profiteering

Vitriol may have obscured important points in a post last week. The growing business strategy of our era is to drive the cost of everyone else’s product to zero in order to make more money from your own product. This imbalance stifles innovation and creation. Continue reading

PeerJ: Silicon Valley Culture Enters Academic Publishing

PeerJ is bringing something new to scholarly publishing, but it’s not a business model or a technology approach — it’s a mindset. Continue reading

Side Dishes by Stewart Wills

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The mission of the Society for Scholarly Publishing (SSP) is "[t]o advance scholarly publishing and communication, and the professional development of its members through education, collaboration, and networking." SSP established The Scholarly Kitchen blog in February 2008 to keep SSP members and interested parties aware of new developments in publishing.
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The Scholarly Kitchen is a moderated and independent blog. Opinions on The Scholarly Kitchen are those of the authors. They are not necessarily those held by the Society for Scholarly Publishing nor by their respective employers.
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