Education, Historical, Nostalgia

The Man Behind Schoolhouse Rock!

Music holds an extraordinary power for learning and memory. A good earworm can stay with you for a lifetime. If you grew up in the US during 1970s or early 1980s, odds are that reading the phrases “conjunction junction” or “three is a magic number” will start songs playing in your head, complete with useful grammatical or numerical information. Schoolhouse Rock! taught a generation our times tables and our way around a sentence. The short video below takes a looks at Bob Dorough, the man behind those songs.

About David Crotty

I am the Editorial Director, Journals Policy for Oxford University Press. I oversee journal policy and contribute to strategy across OUP’s journals program, drive technological innovation, serve as an information officer, and manage a suite of research society-owned journals. I was previously an Executive Editor with Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press, creating and editing new science books and journals, and was the Editor in Chief for Cold Spring Harbor Protocols. I received my Ph.D. in Genetics from Columbia University and did developmental neuroscience research at Caltech before moving from the bench to publishing. I have been elected to the STM Association Board and serve on the interim Board of Directors for CHOR Inc., a not-for-profit public-private partnership to increase public access to research.


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The mission of the Society for Scholarly Publishing (SSP) is "[t]o advance scholarly publishing and communication, and the professional development of its members through education, collaboration, and networking." SSP established The Scholarly Kitchen blog in February 2008 to keep SSP members and interested parties aware of new developments in publishing.
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