Technology

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The Discrete Charm of Geometry – A Review

Amidst the politics of open access, the financial pressure on research libraries, and the sense that ubiquity trumps quality, it is worth remembering that nothing can squash the fervor of academic endeavor. Video is increasingly deployed in the publishing of academic research. Robert Harington explores the importance of using different types of media to provide insight into cultural and historical aspects of a field through a review of a new movie by Ekaterina Eremenko – The Discrete Charm of Geometry. Continue reading

Can You Coko? An Interview with Kristen Ratan of the Collaborative Knowledge Foundation

If you haven’t already heard of the Collaborative Knowledge Foundation (CKF or Coko for short), chances are you soon will. Find out more in this interview with co-founder Kristen Ratan. Continue reading

What Is SocArXiv?

A new “papers service” for social science content was recently launched and is capitalizing on concerns over the sale of a long time preprint server by a commercial publisher. While the timing might be right, the set up looks a little hasty. Continue reading

Optical Illusions — Shifting to Citation Distributions Only Makes It Easier to Fool the Eye

A proposal to substitute graphs of citation distributions for impact factors introduces many problems the authors don’t seem to have fully grasped, including unintentionally bolstering the importance of the very metric they seek to diminish. Continue reading

Have You Looked At This? Yewno

Yewno was formally launched at ALA in Orlando. Is this new technological approach going to re-shape the way undergraduates think about discovery of relevant content? Continue reading

Guest Post, Darrell Gunter: Accessibility Is The New Innovation

Darrell Gunter discusses the great opportunities available in making all forms of content accessible to everyone. Continue reading

Detecting (and Stopping) Robot Pirates

Designed to act like humans, pirate robots avoid detection by keeping download requests low, cycling through journals, and jumping from publisher to publisher. Continue reading

Textbooks in Academic Libraries: The Publisher’s Case

This post presents a case for why publishers would want to participate in a program to sell textbooks to academic libraries. The plan would include a means for publishers to retain their profitability, albeit on a lower sales volume, by taking advantage of digital technology and by “repairing” some broken elements in the current marketplace, e.g., the market for used and pirated books. Continue reading

Copyright, Expectations, and Economics — Can Taylor Swift Help Us Find Our Backbone?

Expectations of free content are entrenched, but artists, authors, and publishers are all hurting because of it. The basic problem? It’s leading to a lack of trust in the future. Continue reading

Rethinking Authentication, Revamping the Business

IP authentication is the most important mechanism for authorizing access to licensed e-resources resources. Substantial business and policy issues for libraries and publishers alike connect up to IP authentication. Today, there is substantial interest in eliminating IP authentication, so it is timely to examine the implications if we were soon to see its end. Continue reading

Two-step Authentication: Finally Coming to a University Near You

Many of the popular tools that we use everyday require two-step authentication. It seems odd that universities, who store data much more valuable than cat videos, recipes, and selfies, are slow to require it. That may change shortly.
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Guest Post: The American Chemical Society on the Shared Cybersecurity Concerns of Universities and Publishers

Jack Ochs from the American Chemical Society discusses the significant increase in cybersecurity threats to both publishers and libraries. Continue reading

Reinventing Scholarly Communications: A Little Less Conversation, A Little More Action?

Charlie Rapple celebrates the many conversations underway to re-imagine scholarly communications – and asks how we can better act on the ideas generated Continue reading

Book Review: “Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind” by Yuval Noah Harari

An excellent book about humankind in general holds important fundamental insights for scholarly publishers, editors, and researchers. Continue reading

The Publishing Industry is Mature, but Publishing Companies are Not

While it certainly is the case that scholarly publishing is a mature business, some of the companies operating in this industry have found new avenues for growth by expanding beyond the publication of content into data science. This is an opportunity that is only available to the larger companies with enlightened management. Continue reading

Is the Proposed Merger of IDPF and W3C Good for Publishers?

The IDPF and the W3C recently announced they were making plans to merge. Will this merger be good for publishers by integrating them more closely into the community that manages the web infrastructure? Or will the merger result in diminishing publisher control over one of the important distribution standards for digital texts? The past five years of experience doesn’t give reason to be reassured of the outcome. Continue reading

Ask The Chefs: What Did You Learn At This Year’s SSP Annual Meeting?

This year the SSP held its Annual Meeting in Vancouver, BC. It was a great success and held insights and lessons for all. Come see what the Chefs had to say when asked: What Did You Learn At This Year’s SSP Annual Meeting? Continue reading

Vitamins, Painkillers, and the Entrepreneurial Library

What does it mean for libraries to be competitive and “entrepreneurial”? And is the very concept a Trojan horse for neoliberalism? Does it matter? Continue reading

Divided We Fall — How a Fragmented Media Space Affects Academia and Scholarly Publishing

The general fragmentation of media and society has profound implications, and may explain to some extent the fragmentation being seen in higher education and scholarly publishing. Continue reading

Bitcoin: A Solution to Publisher Authentication and Usage Accounting

The technology developed to create a crypto-currency may be used to solve two intractable problems in scholarly publishing: authenticating users and counting usage.
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The mission of the Society for Scholarly Publishing (SSP) is "[t]o advance scholarly publishing and communication, and the professional development of its members through education, collaboration, and networking." SSP established The Scholarly Kitchen blog in February 2008 to keep SSP members and interested parties aware of new developments in publishing.
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The Scholarly Kitchen is a moderated and independent blog. Opinions on The Scholarly Kitchen are those of the authors. They are not necessarily those held by the Society for Scholarly Publishing nor by their respective employers.
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