Phil Davis

I am an independent researcher and publishing consultant specializing in the statistical analysis of readership and citation data. I am a former postdoctoral researcher in science communication and former science librarian. http://phil-davis.org/
Phil Davis has written 286 posts for The Scholarly Kitchen

Citable Items: The Contested Impact Factor Denominator

Thomson Reuters’ approach of indexing by journal section and revising by demand leads to great inconsistencies across journals and inflates the Impact Factors of elite journals. The solution: remove the human element. Continue reading

As PLOS ONE Shrinks, 2015 Impact Factor Expected to Rise

How a shrinking journals receives an artificial boost to its leading citation indicator. Continue reading

PNAS: Tighter Editorial Policy Improves NAS Papers

After years of tightening its submissions policy, papers contributed by NAS members start resembling direct submissions. Continue reading

Incremental Improvements Start With A/B Testing

Why do publishers and platform providers spend so little time seeking incremental improvements? Continue reading

PLOS ONE Shrinks by 11 Percent

Can PLOS exist without a mega-journal? Continue reading

PubMed Central Boosts Citations, Study Claims

Researchers claim that PMC boosts citations by 26%. A closer look at the paper reveals serious data and analysis problems. Can we collectively design a better study? Continue reading

Survey: What Do Authors Expect From Peer Review?

Stop thinking of peer review as a concept and start thinking of it as a toolbox. Continue reading

Seeing the Forest (Plot) for the Trees

Clean, data rich, and intuitive, forest plots can be used to visualize publication metrics. Continue reading

Do Academy Members Publish Better Papers?

When journals provide academy members a VIP submission track, do their papers perform any better? Continue reading

When Pragmatism Collides With Fundamentalism-PLOS Hikes Publication Fees

Why did such a small price increase arouse such a big reaction from open access advocates? Continue reading

Extreme Bias: How Rejection Clouds The Eyes of Researchers

The publication experience of authors may come down to a single factor: was the manuscript accepted? Continue reading

Network-based Citation Metrics: Eigenfactor vs. SJR

Can network-based metrics allow us to separate true scientific influence from mere popularity? Continue reading

2014 Journal Impact Factors

Journal additions, suppressions, new metrics and an improved user interface are included in this year’s Journal Citation Report (JCR). Continue reading

Data Curation–The New Killer App

Establishing new citation benchmarks and an international board of academics, Elsevier is poised to take on Thomson Reuters for dominance in the citation metrics market. Continue reading

Citation Boost or Bad Data? Academia.edu Research Under Scrutiny

If a free website claimed that you could double citations to your papers simply by uploading them to their file sharing network, would you believe it? Or would you check their data? Continue reading

Why are Authors Citing Older Papers?

Scholars are citing an increasingly aging collection of scholarship. Does this reflect the growing ease with accessing the literature, or a structural shift in the way science is funded–and the way scientists are rewarded? Continue reading

MONOPOLY-The Publishers Edition

First released in 1935 as a game to teach children the evils of unchecked market capitalism, MONOPOLY-The Publishers’ edition keeps the tradition going. Continue reading

Knockoffs Erode Trust in Metrics Market

If the Internet created a burgeoning market of cheap academic journal knockoffs, should we be surprised to witness new knockoff ratings companies? Continue reading

Production Plummets at PLOS–But For a Good Reason

Is there (ever) a good time to overhaul a publishers’ production system? If you care about your journals’ Impact Factor, the answer is “yes.” Continue reading

PeerJ–A PLOS ONE Contender in 2015?

PeerJ’s first Impact Factor is not expected to surpass 2.000. Without the scale of PLOS ONE, PeerJ may need to seek a larger, diversified buyer. What the journal has to offer other publishers is less clear. Continue reading

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The mission of the Society for Scholarly Publishing (SSP) is "[t]o advance scholarly publishing and communication, and the professional development of its members through education, collaboration, and networking." SSP established The Scholarly Kitchen blog in February 2008 to keep SSP members and interested parties aware of new developments in publishing.
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The Scholarly Kitchen is a moderated and independent blog. Opinions on The Scholarly Kitchen are those of the authors. They are not necessarily those held by the Society for Scholarly Publishing nor by their respective employers.
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