Kent Anderson

I am the Publisher at AAAS/Science. Previously, I have worked as CEO/Publisher of the STRIATUS/JBJS, Inc., a publishing executive at the New England Journal of Medicine, and Director of Medical Journals at the American Academy of Pediatrics. Opinions on social media or blogs are my own.
Kent Anderson has written 1136 posts for The Scholarly Kitchen

Central Casting — The Funding Problems We’re Baking Into the Future of Scholarly Publishing

As we drift into a scholarly economy with centralized payment mechanisms and greater dependence on government funding, are we truly setting ourselves up for long-term independence and success? Continue reading

Loaded Dice — The New Research Conundrums Posed by Mechanical Turk

The use of Mechanical Turk in research may generate misleading data and false information. Do we need to guard against such mechanical methodologies? Continue reading

Taking Our Eye Off the Ball — Why Is Science Suffering in the Modern Age?

While more scientific information than ever is available, science itself is struggling for funding, for cultural footholds, and for priority in society. What has gone wrong? Continue reading

The Flatscreen Install — Moving Collaboration from Print to Digital

Would adding a big flatscreen TV to my office might make a difference? Yes, in big and important ways. Continue reading

A Head of Schedule — The Increasing Importance of Project and Portfolio Management

The project manager has become a critical part of success in a publishing world with more complex systems, processes, and vendor relationships. But finding a good one is still a challenge. Continue reading

Going APE — Thoughts and Insights with a European Perspective

The Academic Publishing in Europe (APE) meeting in Europe is 10 years old, but feels as fresh and frisky as some of the meetings in the US used to. This report touches on some of the most interesting threads of two days’ worth of interesting presentations and conversations. Continue reading

Macmillan + Springer: Some Lessons to Learn, Some Twists to Watch

The merger of Macmillan and Springer holds many lessons and some interesting twists. More than anything, it indicates a future in which scale continues to confer advantages. Continue reading

The New Cluetrain — A Barometer for What Has Changed in the Last 15 Years

Fifteen years later, the authors of the “Cluetrain Manifesto” attempt a relevant update, with 112 new “clues.” Yet, they miss the biggest clue of all — the Internet is no longer sacred and its users know it. Continue reading

Is Google Now a Publisher Offering Other Publishers an Inadequate Deal?

A Spanish court’s decision around Google News suggests that the barter arrangement with Google and other general search engines — in which they pay nothing to license our content — may have a more viable financial future. Continue reading

Cyberwar and Cyberterror — New and Unwelcome Companions in Publishing and Culture

The emerging spectre of cyberwar and cyberterror has real implications for academic and scientific publishers, who already deal with the side effects and may become targets in the future. Continue reading

Exaggerated Claims — Has “Publish or Perish” Become “Publicize or Perish”?

A recent study finds that academic press offices exaggerate claims in their press releases about published research. Worse, the vast majority of these find their way into subsequent reporting. Continue reading

Buried in the Matryoshka — Unpacking the “Value Add” of Peer Review

Publishers often slap labels on activities that are complex, expensive, and high-value. Worse, we often accept people calling these activities “value-add” when they are core functions of how scientific information shared. Continue reading

Confounded Complexity — Pondering the Endless Upgrade Paths of Digital Publishing

We were wrong to expect that online publishing would be cheaper and simpler than print. Acknowledging that, and facing the slower, more complicated commercial world it has created, could put us on a better path. Continue reading

Slow and Steady — Taking the Time to Think in the Age of Rapid Publishing Cycles

Simple things are often more complex than we initially think, and the push for faster publication may be an expensive and risky trend to follow too much further. Continue reading

Dare I Say This? — The Chilling Effect of Gun Laws on Academic Free Speech

Intimidation from armed citizens leads to a speech being canceled, but is part of a more troubling and long-term problem of shootings at schools and on college campuses. Why are we allowing this to happen? Continue reading

Old and Stale? — Aging Researchers, Funding Trends, and the Doughnut Effect

Proposals to get more money to younger researchers shine a light on the aging cadre of academic researchers and the lack of succession we risk with current practices. Continue reading

UPDATED — 82 Things Publishers Do (2014 Edition)

The annual update to the list adds some important items overlooked on prior versions, including design, enforcement of editorial policies, and Board interactions. Continue reading

Virtual Reality Research — Some Early Problems with Data Reanalysis and Risks of Open Data

The idea of “reanalysis” needs to be rethought, if recent examples are any indication of what this trend could do to science. Continue reading

More Data, More Problems — Lessons from the Limitations of Google Flu Trends

“Big data” continues to draw attention, but will it ever amount to more than a hypothesis-generating engine and supplementary findings? Continue reading

Book Review: “What If?: Serious Scientific Answers to Absurd Hypothetical Questions” by Randall Munroe

A new book by the creator of xkcd takes crazy questions about science and tackles them with verve, humor, great illustrations, and great examples of how to break down even the strangest problems. Continue reading

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The mission of the Society for Scholarly Publishing (SSP) is "[t]o advance scholarly publishing and communication, and the professional development of its members through education, collaboration, and networking." SSP established The Scholarly Kitchen blog in February 2008 to keep SSP members and interested parties aware of new developments in publishing.
The Scholarly Kitchen is a moderated and independent blog. Opinions on The Scholarly Kitchen are those of the authors. They are not necessarily those held by the Society for Scholarly Publishing nor by their respective employers.

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