Impact factor

This tag is associated with 75 posts

Revisiting: Splitting the Difference — Does an Editorial Mutiny at a Journal Do Much Long-term Damage?

The recent editorial board defection from an Elsevier journal brings up issues raised in Todd Carpenter’s 2013 post on editorial boycotts and declarations of independence. They generate a lot of heat, but what do the data say about the actual success of the new journals compared to the journals that were overthrown. Continue reading

Seeing the Forest (Plot) for the Trees

Clean, data rich, and intuitive, forest plots can be used to visualize publication metrics. Continue reading

If We don’t Know What Citations Mean, What Does it Mean when We Count Them?

There is no shortage of critique of citation metrics and other efforts to quantify the “impact” of scholarship. Will a report calling for “responsible metrics” help researchers, administrators and funders finally wean themselves? Continue reading

Network-based Citation Metrics: Eigenfactor vs. SJR

Can network-based metrics allow us to separate true scientific influence from mere popularity? Continue reading

When Do Citations Reflect “Impact?”

Citation practices vary between and within STM and HSS; they also vary by discipline and within disciplines. Though citation metrics presume evidence of “impact,” in fact a citation may represent a range of intentions. Given the emphasis on citation indices, isn’t it important to query what scholars are actually doing when they cite another scholar’s work? Continue reading

Knockoffs Erode Trust in Metrics Market

If the Internet created a burgeoning market of cheap academic journal knockoffs, should we be surprised to witness new knockoff ratings companies? Continue reading

Production Plummets at PLOS–But For a Good Reason

Is there (ever) a good time to overhaul a publishers’ production system? If you care about your journals’ Impact Factor, the answer is “yes.” Continue reading

When a Journal Sinks, Should the Editors Go Down with the Ship?

This year, Thomson Reuters suspended six business journals for engaging in a citation cartel. Should the authors be held responsible for the malfeasance of their editors? We propose a new solution to punishing the community for the poor decisions of the few.

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Exhibition Prohibition — Why Shouldn’t Publishers Celebrate an Improved Impact Factor?

A trend toward shaming journals that promote their impact factors needs to be rolled back. Impact factors are journal metrics. It’s the other uses that need to be curtailed. Continue reading

The Mystery of a “Partial” Impact Factor

The lack of an Impact Factor is one reason that new journals have difficulty attracting submissions. Some journals, such as eLife and Cell Reports, qualify for an Impact Factor based on partial data. This post explores how that happens. Continue reading

A Day at the Beach — How the Messiness and Unpredictability of Journals Thwart Granularity

Attempts to use new measurements to more finely predict or represent journal quality are bound to falter because of some qualities inherent to journals themselves. Continue reading

Interview with Thomson Reuters: InCites Platform Offers New Analytics and Transparency

Thomson Reuters launched a new platform called InCites last week. The platform combines Journal Citation Reports with the Essential Science Indicators. In this Q&A, Patricia Brennan from Thomson Reuters describes the new platform and new additions that answer concerns from critics. Continue reading

Stick To Your Ribs: The Impact Factor’s Greatest Hits (and Misses)

Yesterday saw the release of the 2013 Impact Factors for scholarly journals. We present a look back at some favorite posts examining the Impact Factor. Continue reading

NISO Vets Research on Altmetrics

NISO has released the results of their year long study of Altmetrics in draft form for comment. Continue reading

PLOS ONE Output Falls 25 Percent

Publication output for the largest journal in science continues to fall, just not as fast as leading indicators would predict. Continue reading

Happy Anniversary: 50 Years of the Science Citation Index

This week marks the golden anniversary of the Science Citation Index, introduced by Eugene Garfield in 1964. Continue reading

Altmetrics: Mistaking the Means for the End

Should attention metrics play any role whatsoever in researcher assessment? Continue reading

Reinventing the Impact Factor for the 21st century

If we were to build a citation reporting system today, what would it look like? In this post, I propose a solution that would do away with a separate Journal Citation Report (JCR) and propose a suite of services built around the Web of Science, directed to the needs of journal editors and publishers. Continue reading

Altmetrics Boosted by EBSCO’s Acquisition of Plum Analytics

EBSCO has recently acquired altmetrics startup Plum Analytics. What will this mean for both companies and altmetrics in general? Continue reading

Taking Stock In the Kitchen: A Look Back at 2013

A look back at 2013 in The Scholarly Kitchen. Continue reading

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The mission of the Society for Scholarly Publishing (SSP) is "[t]o advance scholarly publishing and communication, and the professional development of its members through education, collaboration, and networking." SSP established The Scholarly Kitchen blog in February 2008 to keep SSP members and interested parties aware of new developments in publishing.
The Scholarly Kitchen is a moderated and independent blog. Opinions on The Scholarly Kitchen are those of the authors. They are not necessarily those held by the Society for Scholarly Publishing nor by their respective employers.

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