Research

This category contains 1058 posts

Optical Illusions — Shifting to Citation Distributions Only Makes It Easier to Fool the Eye

A proposal to substitute graphs of citation distributions for impact factors introduces many problems the authors don’t seem to have fully grasped, including unintentionally bolstering the importance of the very metric they seek to diminish. Continue reading

Wellcome Money — Involvement with F1000 Opens Door on Sketchy Peer Review, COIs, and Spending Decisions

With a new partnership with F1000, Wellcome embraces sketchy peer review standards, deep conflicts of interest, and financial support of a private, commercial enterprise. Worse, the entire thing seems redundant, avoidable, and unnecessary. Continue reading

Will Citation Distributions Reduce Impact Factor Abuses?

Publishing a histogram of a journal’s citation distribution won’t alleviate Impact Factor abuse. At best, it will be ignored. At worse, it will generate confusion. Continue reading

Summertime and Graduate Teaching (Still) Isn’t Easy

Upstream from the work of scholarly publishers, it’s the middle of the deceptively paced academic summer when scholars I know are often focused on conferences, research trips, and writing. Summer isn’t as frantic as the academic year, when every other email from August to June begins with “I know it’s a busy time of year.” … Continue reading

Have You Looked At This? Yewno

Yewno was formally launched at ALA in Orlando. Is this new technological approach going to re-shape the way undergraduates think about discovery of relevant content? Continue reading

Neither Fish Nor Fowl: Journal Publishing and the University Press

University presses are not well positioned to thrive in journal publishing because they have not adopted any of the (relatively few and common) business strategies that are necessary, given market dynamics, for success. I do not put forth this thesis lightly. I have great affection and admiration for university presses, their value — craftsmanship, attention to detail, “getting it right”— and their mission. This is not admiration from afar: I served, in the formative years of my career, at the University of Chicago Press (Chicago), where I learned the tools of the trade and many of the practices and protocols of scholarly publishing still in use today. But after nearly two decades of observing university presses, from within and without, this thesis seems to be inescapable. Continue reading

Margaret Ann Armour at SSP 2016, Crossing Boundaries: Encouraging Diversity

Dr. Margaret Ann Armour’s keynote on diversity in academia and publishing, from the SSP’s 2016 Annual Meeting. Continue reading

Book Review: “Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind” by Yuval Noah Harari

An excellent book about humankind in general holds important fundamental insights for scholarly publishers, editors, and researchers. Continue reading

Ask The Fellows: What Did You Learn At This Year’s SSP Annual Meeting?

We’ve heard from the Chefs about their take on the Annual Meeting, but what were the take-home messages for our early career and student Fellowship Award winners? Come see what the Fellows’ fresh perspective led them to say when asked: What Did You Learn At This Year’s SSP Annual Meeting? Continue reading

Ask The Chefs: What Did You Learn At This Year’s SSP Annual Meeting?

This year the SSP held its Annual Meeting in Vancouver, BC. It was a great success and held insights and lessons for all. Come see what the Chefs had to say when asked: What Did You Learn At This Year’s SSP Annual Meeting? Continue reading

Mind the Gap: Gender Disparity in Scholarly Publishing Revisited

The gender disparity at the top of scholarly publishing – and scholarly communications – is well documented. A recent article in Learned Publishing, discussed during an informal panel session at this year’s SSP conference, shows that not only are women under-represented at the top of our organizations, but also as speakers at our industry conferences. At seven major meetings in 2015, men represented on average over 60% of speakers and nearly two thirds of keynotes, and all male panels prevailed. Continue reading

Divided We Fall — How a Fragmented Media Space Affects Academia and Scholarly Publishing

The general fragmentation of media and society has profound implications, and may explain to some extent the fragmentation being seen in higher education and scholarly publishing. Continue reading

Watching and Documenting An Evolving Scholarly Record

What will scholarly output become? Jill O’Neill, with co-contributors Constance Malpas and Brian Lavoie of OCLC, looks at the evolving scholarly record. Continue reading

Update on a Library Research Project

Preliminary results on a research project on library acquisitions are now in. They suggest some interesting patterns in collection-building; the data from this project will be useful for other researchers. It is hoped that the full roll-out of this project will take place later this year. Continue reading

Publishing, Politics and Reason

Robert Harington grapples with the lack of understanding by the publishing elites on all sides of shifting ideologies of an individual’s relationship to information on the web. Continue reading

Andrea Powell – an interview with CABI’s Chief Information Officer

Robert Harington interviews Andrea Powell, Chief Information Officer at CABI, revealing an inspiring advocate and leader across publishing and technology sectors. Continue reading

Elsevier Acquires SSRN

Today, Elsevier is announcing that it has acquired SSRN, the preprint and publishing community that focuses on social sciences and law. Among other things, the SSRN acquisition is another step in Elsevier’s path towards data and analytics. In a number of ways, Mendeley is the linchpin for this acquisition. More generally, this acquisition plainly indicates Elsevier’s interest in the open access repository space. Finally, universities, their libraries, and other publishers, should have on their minds some of the policy and governance issues around the data that Elsevier is accumulating and the uses to which they may be put. Continue reading

Guest Post, Fred Dylla: Content Sharing Made Simple: A Collaborative Approach

Editor’s Note: Fred Dylla is the Executive Director Emeritus of the American Institute of Physics. With more than 30 years experience as a practicing scientist, Dylla has also taken a leading role as an advocate for the sciences. An important component of the working life of a researcher is — and has been for the … Continue reading

Accessing Publisher Resources via a Mobile Device: A User’s Journey

How do users access content on mobile devices? While many surveys have been done on mobile usage, documenting the user’s experience via “journey mapping” provides a picture of the challenges that remain in using IP authentication in the institutional setting. Continue reading

Image Manipulation: Cleaning Up the Scholarly Record

After hundreds of manipulated images were detected across 40 scientific journals, the real work will be to correct the scientific record. Continue reading

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The mission of the Society for Scholarly Publishing (SSP) is "[t]o advance scholarly publishing and communication, and the professional development of its members through education, collaboration, and networking." SSP established The Scholarly Kitchen blog in February 2008 to keep SSP members and interested parties aware of new developments in publishing.
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The Scholarly Kitchen is a moderated and independent blog. Opinions on The Scholarly Kitchen are those of the authors. They are not necessarily those held by the Society for Scholarly Publishing nor by their respective employers.
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