Controversial Topics

This category contains 882 posts

The Worst Week of Mary Claire-King’s Life: An Amazing Tale from an Amazing Scientist

A remarkable story (with a remarkable punchline) from the great geneticist, Mary Claire-King. Continue reading

Citable Items: The Contested Impact Factor Denominator

Thomson Reuters’ approach of indexing by journal section and revising by demand leads to great inconsistencies across journals and inflates the Impact Factors of elite journals. The solution: remove the human element. Continue reading

An Interview with Jeffrey Beall

An interview with librarian and open access skeptic Jeffrey Beall. He discusses his work, the criteria for declaring an organization a “predatory publisher,” and how he would fix the scholarly communications system. Continue reading

Bulwarks, Agility, and Foresight

[Editor’s note: This is the edited text of a presentation that Joe Esposito gave as a keynote at the PSP conference in Washington, D.C. on Feb. 3, 2016. The slides for the presentation are embedded at the end of the text. Joe would like to thank John Tagler and Sara Pinto of PSP for their assistance … Continue reading

Guest Post: Kent Anderson UPDATED — 96 Things Publishers Do (2016 Edition)

Kent Anderson returns to update his essential list of just what it is that publishers do. Continue reading

The Network Model of Publishing

One of the unanticipated consequences of the introduction of digital media to scholarly publishing is that publishing properties increasingly are organized into networks, with one property pointing to another for the benefit of all. This essay describes the network publishing model and comments on some of a network’s characteristics and economic opportunities. Continue reading

PNAS: Tighter Editorial Policy Improves NAS Papers

After years of tightening its submissions policy, papers contributed by NAS members start resembling direct submissions. Continue reading

What Price Progress: The Costs of an Effective Data Publishing Policy

The hidden costs of data availability policies. Continue reading

The Future of Writing: Tightening Up our Communications, From Just Not Sorry to SEO

Charlie Rapple wonders if controversial browser plug-in Just Not Sorry might have some useful tech behind its current gender-baiting application. Continue reading

The Graduate Student’s Career – A Christmas Morality Tale

It’s easy to think that scientific ethics are straightforward and that results that aren’t robust end up in the literature because some people give into the temptation to cheat. The reality is more complex. If you were in this situation, what would you do? Continue reading

Dear Joe: Not-for-profit Publishers in “The Economy”

Robert Harington discusses Joe Esposito’s Scholarly Kitchen article from June 2015, entitled “The Mixed Marriage of For-profit and Not-for-Profit Publishing”, in context of his own experiences in the world of society publishing. Continue reading

Mr. Market is a Brilliant Editor

Of the many ways to measure the quality of a publication, one that is often overlooked are the workings of the marketplace itself. Purchases for published material is made in large part on the basis of the quality of that material, making the marketplace something of an editor of genius. This mechanism incorporates all other metrics, from impact factor to altmetrics. Unfortunately, the marketplace is not free to exercise its judgment when many participants seek dominant and even monopolistic control. Continue reading

The Dissertation Mess: Balancing Rights and Responsibilities

The broad online availability of theses and dissertations creates difficult tensions between the individual rights of authors, the rights of educational institutions, and the responsibilities that both have to global scholarship and the collective good. How can we resolve those tensions? Continue reading

PubMed Central Boosts Citations, Study Claims

Researchers claim that PMC boosts citations by 26%. A closer look at the paper reveals serious data and analysis problems. Can we collectively design a better study? Continue reading

For Open Access Monographs, Peter Pays Paul. Who Pays Peter?

Gold open access for monographs is based on the notion that provosts will pay for what librarians will not. This seems like an improbable model for scholarly publishing. Publishing that is not based on end-user demand is not likely to have strong support in lean times. Continue reading

Revisiting: Governance and the Not-for-profit Publisher

Revisiting Joe Esposito’s classic post on how the governance of not-for-profit publishing entities plays a large role in those entities’ success or failure. Continue reading

MOOCs Rise from the Ashes

The MOOCs seem to have faded from view. In large part this is because they were so relentlessly overhyped when they first appeared. But now various forms of online education have begun to get traction in the marketplace. An essay by Clay Shirky points out how online education is operating today and its implications for higher education. Continue reading

Ask The Chefs: How Does The Increased Use of Adjunct Faculty Affect Scholarly Publishing?

How does a differentiation between faculty on separate tracks for research or educational roles will drive change in the reward system? How might it impact scholarly publishing? Continue reading

The Death of the Collection and the Necessity of Library-Publisher Collaboration: Young Librarians on the Future of Libraries

Applicants for a recent conference scholarship wrote essays that tended strongly to depict the traditional collection as dead and collaboration between librarians and publishers as essential to the library’s future. Do they herald a generational shift in mindset among librarians? Continue reading

Guest Post: CCC’s Roy Kaufman on Growing Your Open Access Business in an Environment of Peak APC Pricing

CCC’s Roy Kaufman looks at the economic difficulties of the gold open access market, and suggest other pathways for revenue expansion. Continue reading

The Scholarly Kitchen on Twitter

Find Posts by Category

Find Posts by Date

February 2016
S M T W T F S
« Jan    
 123456
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
2829  
SSP_LOGO
The mission of the Society for Scholarly Publishing (SSP) is "[t]o advance scholarly publishing and communication, and the professional development of its members through education, collaboration, and networking." SSP established The Scholarly Kitchen blog in February 2008 to keep SSP members and interested parties aware of new developments in publishing.
......................................
The Scholarly Kitchen is a moderated and independent blog. Opinions on The Scholarly Kitchen are those of the authors. They are not necessarily those held by the Society for Scholarly Publishing nor by their respective employers.
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 20,334 other followers