Research

This category contains 873 posts

The Authors Guild Loses (Again), and HathiTrust Wins–But What Does It Mean?

The Authors Guild’s lawsuit against HathiTrust over the latter’s massive library of digitized print books has been dismissed by the Second Circuit Court. What does this mean for libraries, authors, and readers? Continue reading

The 1% of Scientific Outputs — A Story of Strawmen, Sensationalism, and Scopus

A paper claiming to have identified “the 1%” in productive published researchers may suffer from problems with disambiguation, timing, and scope. Continue reading

Technology and Digital Scholarship

An overview of new tools available, to help us consider how publishing may better incorporate technology in the context of a connected society. Continue reading

Trust But Verify — Identity Fraud and Exploitation of the Trust Economy in Scholarly Publishing

A ruse to self-review and self-recommend papers for publication leads to 60 retractions. Can we find a way to prevent this kind of identity fraud and its consequences? Continue reading

NISO Vets Research on Altmetrics

NISO has released the results of their year long study of Altmetrics in draft form for comment. Continue reading

Ending with Open Access, Beginning with Open Access

Sometimes making something available as open access is viewed as an end in itself, but increasingly we are likely to see OA services work to bring the material they publish to wider audiences. This will involve the creation of new marketing services specific to OA. We have yet to determine how such services will be paid for. Continue reading

Open Access Publication Gains Acceptance With Authors, Licenses Still Problematic

A recent survey of authors by Taylor and Francis reveals growing acceptance of open access publishing; however, Creative Commons licensing may still pose a problem. Continue reading

What Societies Really Think About Open Access

What do societies really think about Open Access? A recent survey, though small, provides some initial answers… Continue reading

Contemplating a Chart — How the Home Page Dominates Thinking . . . and Little Else

A quick analysis of data based on an insight from the New York Times’ “Innovation” Report suggests that the home page dominates thinking far too much, leading to blind spots about what really deserves our design attention. Continue reading

Life in a Bubble — The Limitations of Public Access, the Challenges of Public Engagement

Presumptions about the benefits of access fail to take into account the power and difficulty of true engagement with diverse publics. Continue reading

Side Dishes by Stewart Wills

Find Posts by Category

Find Posts by Date

July 2014
S M T W T F S
« Jun    
 12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
2728293031  

The Scholarly Kitchen on Twitter

SSP_LOGO
The mission of the Society for Scholarly Publishing (SSP) is "[t]o advance scholarly publishing and communication, and the professional development of its members through education, collaboration, and networking." SSP established The Scholarly Kitchen blog in February 2008 to keep SSP members and interested parties aware of new developments in publishing.
......................................
The Scholarly Kitchen is a moderated and independent blog. Opinions on The Scholarly Kitchen are those of the authors. They are not necessarily those held by the Society for Scholarly Publishing nor by their respective employers.
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 13,019 other followers