Research

This category contains 851 posts

Open Access in the Humanities and Social Sciences: An Interview with Chris Wickham

Earlier today, the British Academy released a research project report, Open access journals in Humanities and Social Science. The project was funded by the Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE), and was meant to address practical issues that may arise surrounding open access (OA) publishing, particularly in the Humanities and Social Sciences (HSS). There … Continue reading

Stick to Your Ribs: The Problems With Calling Comments “Post-Publication Peer-Review”

Revisiting Kent Anderson’s 2012 post about how comments and letters probably shouldn’t be branded as “post-publication peer review”. Continue reading

Bitcoin and Flash Traders — Leveraging Scarcity Within the Internet’s Infrastructure

Two ways to leverage scarcity in the computer world are worth examining, because they represent baffling new ways for the rich to get richer. Continue reading

Frontiers of Intimidation — What a Controversial Paper’s Travails Teach Us About Libel Laws and Publishing

Retracting a paper identifying a link between climate change deniers and conspiracy theorists provokes more conspiracy theories, but it turns out the real impetus for retraction is disappointingly parochial and explicable. Continue reading

In (Digital) Scholarly Communications We Trust?

With all the disruption and upheaval in digital scholarly communications, how do today’s researchers decide which articles and publications they can trust to read, cite, and write for? A recent study finds that, somewhat surprisingly, peer review and other traditional tools remain as popular as ever with most groups, though social media is increasingly popular with some. Continue reading

The Measurement of the Thing: Thinking About Metrics, Altmetrics and How to Beat Goodhart’s Law

Can machine readable articles, built on author/editor/publisher curated declarative statements and the associated data (or links thereto), be a way of generating metrics that get us nearer to a ‘standard candle’ of scientific research output? Continue reading

Reproducible Research: A Cautionary Tale

Public access to research data offers clear benefits for reproducibility in some fields. But in the world of cancer cell biology, complexity reigns, and replicating results is not so easy a process. Continue reading

What Library Directors Are Thinking: An Ithaka S+R Survey Report

Ithaka S+R has just published the latest in its ongoing series of triennial library director surveys, and its findings are interesting and, in some ways, sobering. Continue reading

Name identification using the ISNI: An interview with Laura Dawson

As online systems for discovering and distributing content have grown, so too has the need for unambiguous identification of people and the parties exchanging that content. Several systems have been in development in the past couple of years, notably the Open Researcher and Contributor ID (ORCID) and the International Standard Name Identifier (ISNI) system. How these two systems relate, engage each other, and serve community needs isn’t always clear. In hopes of alleviating some of the confusion, I sat down with Laura Dawson from Bowker to discuss the International Standard Name Identifier, how it relates to ORCID, and other issues surrounding identity management systems. Continue reading

PLOS ONE Output Falls Following Impact Factor Decline

Are authors leaving PLOS ONE for higher performing journals? Continue reading

Side Dishes by Stewart Wills

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The mission of the Society for Scholarly Publishing (SSP) is "[t]o advance scholarly publishing and communication, and the professional development of its members through education, collaboration, and networking." SSP established The Scholarly Kitchen blog in February 2008 to keep SSP members and interested parties aware of new developments in publishing.
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The Scholarly Kitchen is a moderated and independent blog. Opinions on The Scholarly Kitchen are those of the authors. They are not necessarily those held by the Society for Scholarly Publishing nor by their respective employers.
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