Research

This category contains 1017 posts

Bulwarks, Agility, and Foresight

[Editor’s note: This is the edited text of a presentation that Joe Esposito gave as a keynote at the PSP conference in Washington, D.C. on Feb. 3, 2016. The slides for the presentation are embedded at the end of the text. Joe would like to thank John Tagler and Sara Pinto of PSP for their assistance … Continue reading

“Research Mechanics”, OA, Ethics, and More: Three Chefs Musings on APE 2016

Whether or not you attended this years APE (Academic Publishing in Europe) conference yourself, find out what three of the Scholarly Kitchen chefs thought of the meeting – our overall impressions and key take-home messages. Continue reading

The Importance of Academic (History) Writing

Historians can and do play a vital role in the public humanities, but there are vital reasons not just why but how we write for one another, too. Continue reading

The Open Syllabus Project, Altmetrics, and a New Dataset

The Open Syllabus Project has created a database of over 1 million college syllabuses and extracted the names of the materials used in these courses. These materials are analyzed quantitatively and ranked. The creators of the service propose a new metric for the evaluation of academic publications. Continue reading

Ask The Chefs: What Do You See On The Horizon For Scholarly Publishing In 2016?

January seems like the perfect time to look forward and think about what we might expect to see this coming year. This month we asked the Chefs what they think is on the horizon for 2016. Continue reading

The Network Model of Publishing

One of the unanticipated consequences of the introduction of digital media to scholarly publishing is that publishing properties increasingly are organized into networks, with one property pointing to another for the benefit of all. This essay describes the network publishing model and comments on some of a network’s characteristics and economic opportunities. Continue reading

NYPL Shows Academic Libraries What “Public Domain” Means

The New York Public Library has now opened up hundreds of thousands of their digitized public-domain documents to unrestricted access and reuse, encouraging members the general public to exercise all the rights in those documents that the law gives them. Why aren’t more academic libraries doing the same thing? Continue reading

PNAS: Tighter Editorial Policy Improves NAS Papers

After years of tightening its submissions policy, papers contributed by NAS members start resembling direct submissions. Continue reading

What Price Progress: The Costs of an Effective Data Publishing Policy

The hidden costs of data availability policies. Continue reading

The Future of Writing: Tightening Up our Communications, From Just Not Sorry to SEO

Charlie Rapple wonders if controversial browser plug-in Just Not Sorry might have some useful tech behind its current gender-baiting application. Continue reading

Why Some Publishers are Requiring ORCID iDs for Authors: An Interview with Stuart Taylor, The Royal Society

A group of eight publishers today announced that, during 2016, they will begin requiring authors to use an ORCID identifier (iD) during the publication process. The first to do so is The Royal Society, which has introduced this requirement beginning January 1, 2016. In this interview, their Publishing Director, Stuart Taylor, explains why. Continue reading

The Graduate Student’s Career – A Christmas Morality Tale

It’s easy to think that scientific ethics are straightforward and that results that aren’t robust end up in the literature because some people give into the temptation to cheat. The reality is more complex. If you were in this situation, what would you do? Continue reading

All about ORCID

Last week ORCID published the results of its first major survey. Around 6,000 respondents globally – ORCID record holders and non record holders – provided feedback on their perceptions and understanding of ORCID. Find out what they said… Continue reading

What Does “Brand” Mean for Library-based Presses?

Library-based publishing is growing. A recent survey in Australia shows that “increasing visibility of the university brand” is a common objective. Charlie Rapple considers some of the challenges relating to brand for this growing sector. Continue reading

The Dissertation Mess: Balancing Rights and Responsibilities

The broad online availability of theses and dissertations creates difficult tensions between the individual rights of authors, the rights of educational institutions, and the responsibilities that both have to global scholarship and the collective good. How can we resolve those tensions? Continue reading

PubMed Central Boosts Citations, Study Claims

Researchers claim that PMC boosts citations by 26%. A closer look at the paper reveals serious data and analysis problems. Can we collectively design a better study? Continue reading

Revisiting: Governance and the Not-for-profit Publisher

Revisiting Joe Esposito’s classic post on how the governance of not-for-profit publishing entities plays a large role in those entities’ success or failure. Continue reading

CHORUS Gets a Boost from Federal Agencies – But Will New Approaches Make It Harder to Implement?

As more funders look to adopt CHORUS for providing public access to works derived from federal funds, a review of the publisher requirements for participating in CHORUS seems timely. This post explores the current state of CHORUS agency adoption and some important new requirements. Continue reading

Ask The Chefs: How Does The Increased Use of Adjunct Faculty Affect Scholarly Publishing?

How does a differentiation between faculty on separate tracks for research or educational roles will drive change in the reward system? How might it impact scholarly publishing? Continue reading

Dismantling the Stumbling Blocks that Impede Researcher Access to E-Resources

The user experience of working with e-journals and ebooks in an academic setting has failed to keep up with changing practices and preferences for how researchers now expect to access the scholarly literature.I called attention to some of these limitations in a presentation at the STM Association annual conference in October.The video of my talk is now available: I hope you enjoy the presentation Continue reading

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The mission of the Society for Scholarly Publishing (SSP) is "[t]o advance scholarly publishing and communication, and the professional development of its members through education, collaboration, and networking." SSP established The Scholarly Kitchen blog in February 2008 to keep SSP members and interested parties aware of new developments in publishing.
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The Scholarly Kitchen is a moderated and independent blog. Opinions on The Scholarly Kitchen are those of the authors. They are not necessarily those held by the Society for Scholarly Publishing nor by their respective employers.
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