World of Tomorrow

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Peering across the Copyright DMZ

A new book reviews various instances of piracy in the media industry and proposes using Big Data analyses as a means to manage it. Continue reading

Ask The Chefs: Where Is The Balance Between Security, Authentication, Marketing, and Privacy?

How much privacy are you willing to relinquish for convenience? How much effort are you willing to expend for security? This month we asked the chefs: Where Is The Balance Between Security, Authentication, Marketing, and Privacy? Continue reading

Economics, Silicon Valley, and Information Warfare — Is Accuracy Becoming a Luxury Item? Or a Casualty?

Information warfare is both tactical and strategic, with much of its success stemming from the weakened economics of the current information economy. Scholarly publishers have experienced this in many ways, from Google Scholar to predatory publishers to pre-print archives — all answers to the calls for “free information” and all revealing tactical and strategic vulnerabilities as accuracy and facts become luxury items in the information war. Continue reading

PIDapalooza – Revenge of the Nerds

PIDapalooza, the first ever festival of persistent identifiers, set out not only to bring together the creators and users of PIDs, but also to make PIDs cool. Did it succeed? Find out in this report on the event from Alice Meadows and Phill Jones Continue reading

2016 In Review

John Oliver gives 2016 the thrashing it so clearly deserves. Continue reading

How’s That “Abundance” Thing Working Out For You?

The age of information abundance may have fundamental flaws — barriers to entry that create false equivalence; dissemination tools that conflate fake information with responsible sources; self-reinforcing loops of conspiracy and paranoia; and social fragmentation that makes societal disruption more likely. What can be done? Here are a few ideas. Continue reading

The US Election, a Need for Curation, and the Power of Story

A post election look at what publishers can learn from the process. Continue reading

How Wrong Is Greta Van Susteren about Libraries?

Is Greta Van Susteren right in taking universities to task for building “huge libraries” and in characterizing them as “vanity projects” that have been obviated by the growing online availability of books and other scholarly resources? Obviously not — that’s the position of an ignorant philistine. Except… Continue reading

Why Technology Will Not Get Cheaper

The long-desired hope that digital publishing will be cheaper gets more cold water, as infrastructure and personnel costs continue to rise, with no real end in sight. Continue reading

Managing the Cost Burden — Is the Pendulum Swinging Back to the Individual Market?

The pendulum for revenues swung from personal subscriptions to institutional subscriptions with the rise of digital options. With growth capped, a new mix of access options is likely to emerge. Continue reading

Can An Algorithm Outperform Science Editors?

Artificial intelligence outperformed human editors in selecting high-impact papers, a Canadian software company claims. Really? Then show me the paper! Continue reading

Revisiting: The Editorial Fallacy

Revisiting Joe Esposito’s 2010 post on the disruptive publishing environment, in which publishers cannot rely on a purely editorial strategy, as many of the issues now facing them are not editorial in nature. Continue reading

Love That Dirty Water — Are We Headed Toward a “Clean Science Act”?

With greater awareness of the foibles and failings of scientific publishing, weaker self-regulation systems, and a trend toward governmental regulation of funding, is external regulation of the scientific journals system now inevitable? Continue reading

Innovation, Growth and the Art of Balance

Robert Harington references our current altered state in politics as a tool to reflect on the need to invoke balance in publishing innovation, and growth. Continue reading

APCs and Competition: What Shulenberger Got Wrong

Would a systemwide “flip” to open access by means of universal article-processing charges work? David Shulenberger argues that it would not, and he may be right — but not for the reasons he gives. Continue reading

Old Media, New Media, Data Media: Evolving Publishing Paradigms

We typically classify publishers as Old Media and New Media, but now we have companies that are part of a new paradigm, the Dat Media company. Such companies sit above both Old and New, studying patterns in usage and in the databases of information aggregated by publishers. Continue reading

Ask The Chefs: What Is The Future Of Peer Review?

Looking forward to Peer Review Week, we asked the Chefs “What is the future of peer review?” #PeerRevWk16 Continue reading

Book Review — The Traps of Big Data Revealed in “Weapons of Math Destruction” by Cathy O’Neil

The new book, “Weapons of Math Destruction,” calls out many worrying trends in the application of big data, with particularly salient entries on higher education rankings, for-profit universities, the justice system, insurance, and employment. Continue reading

Guest Post: Emory’s Gary Miller, “The Literature of Science”

Emory Professor and journal Editor in Chief Gary Miller offers a long term view of the scholarly literature and offers thoughts on the important values worth preserving in the shift from print to digital. Continue reading

Guest Post: INASP’s Jonathan Harle on Why Publishers Need to Pay Attention to the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals

INASP’s Jon Harle looks at the United Nation’s Global Goals and explains why they matter to publishers. Continue reading

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The mission of the Society for Scholarly Publishing (SSP) is "[t]o advance scholarly publishing and communication, and the professional development of its members through education, collaboration, and networking." SSP established The Scholarly Kitchen blog in February 2008 to keep SSP members and interested parties aware of new developments in publishing.
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The Scholarly Kitchen is a moderated and independent blog. Opinions on The Scholarly Kitchen are those of the authors. They are not necessarily those held by the Society for Scholarly Publishing nor by their respective employers.