Peer Review

This category contains 372 posts

#RecognizeReview

Learn how and why different organizations are recognizing the work of their reviewers in this video to celebrate the theme of Peer Review Week 2016 — #RecognizeReview. Continue reading

Annotations as Peer Review: An Interview with Maryann Martone of Hypothes.is

Today’s contribution to Peer Review Week 2016 is an interview with Maryann Martone of Hypothes.is, which examines the important — but often overlooked — role of annotation in peer review. Continue reading

Peer Review in the Humanities and Social Sciences: If It Ain’t Broke, Don’t Fix It?

Next up in our series of posts celebrating Peer Review Week 2016 is a conversation about peer review in the humanities and social sciences. Chefs Alison Mudditt and Karin Wulf, together with Mary Francis of the University of Michigan Press, discuss the differences and similarities between peer review in HSS and STEM disciplines, and between reviews for books and journals in HSS. Continue reading

Guest Post: Publons’ Tom Culley — Are We Doing Enough for Editors?  

In the second post in our series to celebrate Peer Review Week 2016, guest author Tom Culley of Publons looks at the critical role played by editors in the peer review process and asks how we can better recognize it. Continue reading

Is More Recognition the Key to Peer Review Success?

As we celebrate Peer Review Week, this post summarizes some of the reviewer preferences along with ways to boost recognition for peer review activities. #PeerRevWk16 Continue reading

Ask The Chefs: What Is The Future Of Peer Review?

Looking forward to Peer Review Week, we asked the Chefs “What is the future of peer review?” #PeerRevWk16 Continue reading

Hollywood Takes on Peer Review

This summer’s blockbuster movie “Ghostbusters” is, amazingly, about academic peer review and the quality of scholarly publishing. Is it possible that the specialized world of scholarly communications now has mass appeal? Continue reading

When Bad Science Wins, or “I’ll See It When I Believe It”

Observational studies claiming an open access citation advantage just keep coming, despite problems in reproducibility and a lack of adequate controls. Are we in for a similar literature on the subject of the impact of social media on readership and citation? Continue reading

Wellcome Money — Involvement with F1000 Opens Door on Sketchy Peer Review, COIs, and Spending Decisions

With a new partnership with F1000, Wellcome embraces sketchy peer review standards, deep conflicts of interest, and financial support of a private, commercial enterprise. Worse, the entire thing seems redundant, avoidable, and unnecessary. Continue reading

Peer Review Week 2016 #RecognizeReview

Peer Review Week is back! After a successful first year, planning for Peer Review Week 2016 is in full swing. This post will give you an outline of the week focusing on Recognition for Review. Continue reading

What If Academic and Scholarly Publishers Paid Research Authors?

It’s a question that has lurked around the edges of our campfire for a while — what if publishers paid authors of research papers? Quickly, it becomes clear why this is very unlikely to happen — for financial, ethical, and practical reasons. Continue reading

The Open Scholarship Initiative: Talking a Good Game, But Can We Deliver?

A look back at the recent Open Scholarship Initiative conference, from several Scholarly Kitchen “Chefs” who attended. Continue reading

Image Manipulation: Cleaning Up the Scholarly Record

After hundreds of manipulated images were detected across 40 scientific journals, the real work will be to correct the scientific record. Continue reading

Sensationalism or Legitimate Worries? Examining the Cottage Industry of Journal Criticism and Science Alarmism

We’re in a thicket of stories proclaiming “science is broken” and that stealing articles isn’t stealing because, publishers. This cottage industry of journal bashing and science trashing has reached a crescendo. What drives it? And what more important stories are being missed in the maelstrom? Continue reading

Three Things Scholarly Publishers Should Know About Researchers

We’ve looked recently at things publishers want researchers to understand better. Are there things researchers in turn want publishers to understand better? Charlie Rapple opens a discussion. Continue reading

The New(ish) Kids on the Block – Touring the Megajournals

A tour of four major “megajournals” and some of their neighbors finds a few common approaches and a few distinguishing features, but the entire category may need to be rethought given the lack of “mega” generally among the set. Continue reading

Ask The Chefs: What Is The Biggest Misconception People Have About Scholarly Publishing?

What is the biggest misconception people have about scholarly publishing? That’s what we asked the Chefs this month. Now we’re asking you. What did we miss? Continue reading

The Downside of Scale for Journal Publishers: Quality Control and Filtration

Scale can be achieved by broadly outsourcing the editorial process. Does this lead to a loss in quality control, and is this acceptable? Continue reading

Seven Things Every Researcher Should Know About Scholarly Publishing

After many and long conversations among colleagues within and beyond the Scholarly Kitchen
about what researchers need to know about scholarly publishing, Alice Meadows and Karin Wulf compiled a list of what we think to be the most urgent issues.
Continue reading

The Illicit Love Affair between Open Access and Traditional Publishing

At the recent PSP conference there was a panel on the cost of complying with the many new open access mandates from funding bodies. The panel explored the cost of compliance and how to reduce those costs. The current regulatory regime is complicated and administratively expensive, but the mandates will continue to be promulgated because the people calling for them are not the ones that have to implement them. Continue reading

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The mission of the Society for Scholarly Publishing (SSP) is "[t]o advance scholarly publishing and communication, and the professional development of its members through education, collaboration, and networking." SSP established The Scholarly Kitchen blog in February 2008 to keep SSP members and interested parties aware of new developments in publishing.
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The Scholarly Kitchen is a moderated and independent blog. Opinions on The Scholarly Kitchen are those of the authors. They are not necessarily those held by the Society for Scholarly Publishing nor by their respective employers.