Tools

This category contains 877 posts

The Size of Things, Local Edition: Why Maps Are Wrong

Last Friday’s post looked at visualizations for the relative sizes of celestial objects. But for most of us, a Blue Supergiant Star remains something of an abstract concept. This week, a look closer to home. Continue reading

A Quick Tour Around the World of Scholarly Journal Publishing

A presentation to the 2016 ISMTE US Conference. Something of a “state of our industry” overview, or perhaps, everything I needed to know I learned from the other bloggers at The Scholarly Kitchen. Continue reading

Curation Nation: Thoughts on the Future of Textbooks

Is there a role for a curated, remixing approach to developing next generation textbooks. Robert Harington investigates the role of curated open textbooks in teaching today’s students, looking at some of the available tools, the way in which instructors utilize such tools, and issues around fair use of content. Continue reading

The Size of Things (and the Power of a Consistent Frame of Reference)

How does a new visualization of the size of the universe stack up to the classic standard? Continue reading

Locks, Keys, and Firewalls — Why Internet Security Requires Digital, Analog . . . and Diligent Humans

Internet security seems to be crumbling before our eyes, and our media and leaders are not immune and lack a crucial understanding of how vulnerable a totally digital world can be. The answer may lie with analog technologies. Continue reading

How to Manipulate a Citation Histogram

Citation indexes need to provide standardized citation histograms for editors and publishers. Without them, it is unlikely that they will be widely adopted. At worse, it will encourage the production of histograms that selectively highlight or obscure the data. Continue reading

Coming Soon: Battles Over Academic Privacy — But Is This Fight Already Over?

How much is the privacy of academics worth? Judging by the behavior of most people, seemingly very little. Continue reading

Nuts and Bolts: The Super Long List of Things to Do When Starting a New Journal     

Launching a new journal is a lot of work. This post looks at the basic “to do” list of logistical details that need to be done to successfully launch a new journal. Continue reading

Life on the Launch Pad — The Ups and Downs of Product Development, and Why It’s Hard to Achieve Orbit

Product development has surged back into the fore, in both incremental and paradigm-shifting ways. Yet, some cultures still struggle with it, and the need for the right teams and approaches — especially marketing and sales — remains high. Continue reading

The Discrete Charm of Geometry – A Review

Amidst the politics of open access, the financial pressure on research libraries, and the sense that ubiquity trumps quality, it is worth remembering that nothing can squash the fervor of academic endeavor. Video is increasingly deployed in the publishing of academic research. Robert Harington explores the importance of using different types of media to provide insight into cultural and historical aspects of a field through a review of a new movie by Ekaterina Eremenko – The Discrete Charm of Geometry. Continue reading

Can You Coko? An Interview with Kristen Ratan of the Collaborative Knowledge Foundation

If you haven’t already heard of the Collaborative Knowledge Foundation (CKF or Coko for short), chances are you soon will. Find out more in this interview with co-founder Kristen Ratan. Continue reading

Optical Illusions — Shifting to Citation Distributions Only Makes It Easier to Fool the Eye

A proposal to substitute graphs of citation distributions for impact factors introduces many problems the authors don’t seem to have fully grasped, including unintentionally bolstering the importance of the very metric they seek to diminish. Continue reading

Peer Review Week 2016 #RecognizeReview

Peer Review Week is back! After a successful first year, planning for Peer Review Week 2016 is in full swing. This post will give you an outline of the week focusing on Recognition for Review. Continue reading

Have You Looked At This? Yewno

Yewno was formally launched at ALA in Orlando. Is this new technological approach going to re-shape the way undergraduates think about discovery of relevant content? Continue reading

Guest Post, Darrell Gunter: Accessibility Is The New Innovation

Darrell Gunter discusses the great opportunities available in making all forms of content accessible to everyone. Continue reading

Paying for Compliance: A Potential Path Forward for Institutional Repositories

A pilot between Elsevier and the University of Florida suggests solutions for long-running failings of institutional repositories. Continue reading

Rethinking Authentication, Revamping the Business

IP authentication is the most important mechanism for authorizing access to licensed e-resources resources. Substantial business and policy issues for libraries and publishers alike connect up to IP authentication. Today, there is substantial interest in eliminating IP authentication, so it is timely to examine the implications if we were soon to see its end. Continue reading

Book Review: “Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind” by Yuval Noah Harari

An excellent book about humankind in general holds important fundamental insights for scholarly publishers, editors, and researchers. Continue reading

Vitamins, Painkillers, and the Entrepreneurial Library

What does it mean for libraries to be competitive and “entrepreneurial”? And is the very concept a Trojan horse for neoliberalism? Does it matter? Continue reading

Update on a Library Research Project

Preliminary results on a research project on library acquisitions are now in. They suggest some interesting patterns in collection-building; the data from this project will be useful for other researchers. It is hoped that the full roll-out of this project will take place later this year. Continue reading

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The mission of the Society for Scholarly Publishing (SSP) is "[t]o advance scholarly publishing and communication, and the professional development of its members through education, collaboration, and networking." SSP established The Scholarly Kitchen blog in February 2008 to keep SSP members and interested parties aware of new developments in publishing.
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The Scholarly Kitchen is a moderated and independent blog. Opinions on The Scholarly Kitchen are those of the authors. They are not necessarily those held by the Society for Scholarly Publishing nor by their respective employers.
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