Dyslexics experience the world a little differently, and there’s a spectrum to the condition from mild to severe. As someone who occasionally has a mild dyslexic moment, I appreciate this clever way of addressing the typographical basis for some of the confusion dyslexics can experience reading. What’s also striking in one section is the clear (to me) inference that dyslexics probably helped create the alphabet through the easy visual creativity they bring to manipulating shapes — hence, an “n” becomes a “u” and a “b” becomes a “p” becomes a “d”.

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Kent Anderson

Kent Anderson

Kent Anderson is the CEO of RedLink and RedLink Network, a past-President of SSP, and the founder of the Scholarly Kitchen. He has worked as Publisher at AAAS/Science, CEO/Publisher of JBJS, Inc., a publishing executive at the Massachusetts Medical Society, Publishing Director of the New England Journal of Medicine, and Director of Medical Journals at the American Academy of Pediatrics. Opinions on social media or blogs are his own.

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Discussion

6 Thoughts on "Dyslexie — A New Typeface Cleverly Designed to Help Dyslexics Read"

This was clearly done by a non-native English speaker. The clue is that none of us would say “prevent this to happen.”

Yes, I caught that, too. But there was no way to prevent it to happen.

“What’s also striking in one section is the clear (to me) inference that dyslexics probably helped create the alphabet through the easy visual creativity they bring to manipulating shapes”

I don’t see that inference in the video, but more importantly I don’t see that at all. Here dyslectics tried to prevent similarities in clever ways. (Well, maybe not so clever if it was a harder read for normal readers. However, the video was unclear on that point.)

Similarities are, IIRC, usually predicted from initial ease of media production (cuneiform, runes, lead fonts). Asians have more flexible media (ink brush calligraphy) and correlated to that more font diversity (say, sinographs).

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