Authors

This category contains 666 posts

Old and Stale? — Aging Researchers, Funding Trends, and the Doughnut Effect

Proposals to get more money to younger researchers shine a light on the aging cadre of academic researchers and the lack of succession we risk with current practices. Continue reading

UPDATED — 82 Things Publishers Do (2014 Edition)

The annual update to the list adds some important items overlooked on prior versions, including design, enforcement of editorial policies, and Board interactions. Continue reading

Virtual Reality Research — Some Early Problems with Data Reanalysis and Risks of Open Data

The idea of “reanalysis” needs to be rethought, if recent examples are any indication of what this trend could do to science. Continue reading

Stick To Your Ribs: What Does A Scientist Want?

Revisiting Joe Esposito’s post on the real world concerns of the research community. Although many people claim to know what scientists want, the author’s own ongoing survey has come up with results that are at odds with most conventional wisdom. This post summarizes those findings and identifies a near-universal view held by many scientists. Continue reading

When a Journal Sinks, Should the Editors Go Down with the Ship?

This year, Thomson Reuters suspended six business journals for engaging in a citation cartel. Should the authors be held responsible for the malfeasance of their editors? We propose a new solution to punishing the community for the poor decisions of the few.

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Book Review: “What If?: Serious Scientific Answers to Absurd Hypothetical Questions” by Randall Munroe

A new book by the creator of xkcd takes crazy questions about science and tackles them with verve, humor, great illustrations, and great examples of how to break down even the strangest problems. Continue reading

Surprise, Surprise — The Web Turns Out to Be Too Persistent

The recent “right to be forgotten” case raises a corollary issue for scholarly publishers — are you managing your archives so that users have been given the “right to ignore”? Continue reading

Quality and Relevance: A Matrix Model for Thinking about Scholarly Books and Libraries

Libraries do not have the luxury (or the mission) of selecting books solely based on their intrinsic quality. In order to do their work, the students and scholars served by the library need access to books that are highly relevant to their interests. How do the variables of quality and relevance interact with each other when it comes to library book purchasing? Continue reading

Guest Post: Elisabeth Jones on Monograph Costs and Urban Legends–What’s Wrong with This Picture?

Guest Chef Elisabeth Jones offers a critical analysis of a widely-distributed statistical chart that seems to show a doubling in the unit cost of monographs since 1985. Continue reading

The Editor — A Vital Role We Barely Talk About Anymore

An alien landing in the scholarly and scientific publishing world today, reading all the opinions about how to make things more efficient and effective, might be forgiven for thinking there are only authors, readers, librarians, and reviewers. After all, those are the roles we mostly talk about these days. We’ve focused so exclusively, and in … Continue reading

Side Dishes by Stewart Wills

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The Scholarly Kitchen on Twitter

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The mission of the Society for Scholarly Publishing (SSP) is "[t]o advance scholarly publishing and communication, and the professional development of its members through education, collaboration, and networking." SSP established The Scholarly Kitchen blog in February 2008 to keep SSP members and interested parties aware of new developments in publishing.
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The Scholarly Kitchen is a moderated and independent blog. Opinions on The Scholarly Kitchen are those of the authors. They are not necessarily those held by the Society for Scholarly Publishing nor by their respective employers.
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