This category contains 735 posts

Chefs’ Selections: The Best Books Read During 2015 Part 2

The beginning of the holiday season means it’s time for our annual list of our favorite books read during the year. Today brings Part 2 of the list. Continue reading

Chefs’ Selections: The Best Books Read During 2015 Part 1

The beginning of the holiday season means it’s time for our annual list of our favorite books read during the year. Part 1 today, Part 2 tomorrow. Continue reading

Space Travel in Layman’s Terms

Can you explain a complex scientific process using only the most common 1,000 words in our language? Continue reading

Ask The Chefs: How Does The Increased Use of Adjunct Faculty Affect Scholarly Publishing?

How does a differentiation between faculty on separate tracks for research or educational roles will drive change in the reward system? How might it impact scholarly publishing? Continue reading

The Death of the Collection and the Necessity of Library-Publisher Collaboration: Young Librarians on the Future of Libraries

Applicants for a recent conference scholarship wrote essays that tended strongly to depict the traditional collection as dead and collaboration between librarians and publishers as essential to the library’s future. Do they herald a generational shift in mindset among librarians? Continue reading

Guest Post: Richard Fisher on The Monograph: Keep On Keepin’ On*, Part Two

In Part Two, Richard Fisher looks at the past, the present and the future of monograph publishing in the humanities and social sciences. Continue reading

University Presses in Decline…Not so Fast

Alison Mudditt asks a group of experts: what are the unique contributions that university presses make to scholarship and scholarly communication?
Continue reading

Revisiting: Splitting the Difference — Does an Editorial Mutiny at a Journal Do Much Long-term Damage?

The recent editorial board defection from an Elsevier journal brings up issues raised in Todd Carpenter’s 2013 post on editorial boycotts and declarations of independence. They generate a lot of heat, but what do the data say about the actual success of the new journals compared to the journals that were overthrown. Continue reading

Is Reviewer Fatigue a Real Thing?

Editors are quick to assume that reviewer fatigue is slowing them down; but one journal found that excessive invitations to review was not cited as a major reason why reviewers declined invitations. Continue reading

Books, Glorious Books: Explorations in Open Access Monograph Publishing

A range of open access (OA) monograph experiments and studies are upon us, or are about to be, and it’s worth taking a look at what we know now and what we can expect to know in the next year or so as a result. OA poses very different challenges and opportunities for journals and … Continue reading

Is Exposure Always a Good Thing?

A key element of open access is the notion that circulating information is de facto a positive good.   Audiences benefit from access, and scholars benefit from exposure. But for the latter, at least, there is a case to be made for a more subtle approach. Scholars do want their research to be shared widely, but not always … Continue reading

Another Big Win for Google Books (and for Researchers)

Google wins in court (again) as the Second Circuit of Appeals rules that its mass book digitization program qualifies as fair use. But Google is a commercial entity! And their files might get hacked! And their library partners are even more susceptible to copyright pirates than Google is! Yes, said the court, but. . . Continue reading

Guest Post: Alison Mudditt Interviews Geoffry Crossick on An Age of Challenge and Opportunity: The HEFCE Report on Monographs and Open Access

Alison Muddit interviews Goeffrey Crossick about his report on the future of open access monographs. Continue reading

What is an Academic Journal?

We spend much time these days wondering when the academic journal as we know it will cease to exist. Robert Harington discusses the role of the journal in light of a fascinating new venture in the field of mathematics – the overlay journal Discrete Analysis. Continue reading

Think. Check. Submit. (How to Have Trust in Your Publisher.)

Charlie Rapple reports on “Think. Check. Submit.”, a campaign to help researchers learn who they can trust when they are seeking to publish their work. Continue reading

Revisiting: The Editor — A Vital Role We Barely Talk About Anymore

Revisiting Kent Anderson’s 2014 post on the importance of editors–how much of what we see as a failure of “peer review” is really a failure of editorial oversight? Continue reading

Library Publishing Redux: An Unprecedented Example of a Scholar/Library/Publisher Partnership

A collaborative venture between Oxford University Press and the University of Utah’s J. Willard Marriott Library exemplifies a new approach to library publishing, one that could be replicated elsewhere with relative ease and that offers potentially huge benefits to scholarship. Continue reading

What Is “Publishing” if Even a Library Can Do It?

Libraries increasingly provide a wide range of publishing activities, but are there some areas where libraries are not active? It appears that libraries are unlikely to play a large role in publishing that is based on end-user demand. Continue reading

Looking to the Future of Narrative

The novelist Iain Pears has produce a book on an interactive app, noting that his work had come up against the limitations of the printed page. What are the implications of experiments in narrative form for other kinds of publishing? Continue reading

Extreme Bias: How Rejection Clouds The Eyes of Researchers

The publication experience of authors may come down to a single factor: was the manuscript accepted? Continue reading

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The mission of the Society for Scholarly Publishing (SSP) is "[t]o advance scholarly publishing and communication, and the professional development of its members through education, collaboration, and networking." SSP established The Scholarly Kitchen blog in February 2008 to keep SSP members and interested parties aware of new developments in publishing.
The Scholarly Kitchen is a moderated and independent blog. Opinions on The Scholarly Kitchen are those of the authors. They are not necessarily those held by the Society for Scholarly Publishing nor by their respective employers.

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