Tools

This category contains 807 posts

A Single User Account

Academics’ expectations for user experience are set not by reference to improvements relative to the past but increasingly in comparison with their experiences on consumer internet services and mobile devices. The best solution for research, teaching, and learning would be a single account for each user, controlled by that individual, and accepted portably across services and platforms. Continue reading

Summertime and the Reading Is Easy

My nominee for a summer reading book, Mr. Penumbra’s 24-Hour Bookstore. This is a humorous book set in San Francisco. It playfully describes the clash between the new technology and the old world of printed books. Continue reading

Optical Illusions, Legibility and How to Choose the Right Font

An entertaining lecture on the tricks of typography. Continue reading

Scholarly Kitchen Podcast: “101 Innovations” and Scientific Workflow

Jeroen Bosman and Bianca Kramer, librarians at Utrecht University, talk with podcast host Stewart Wills about their 101 Innovations project. Continue reading

Thinking about Internet Scale

The Internet operates on a scale unlike anything we have seen before. How must publishing adapt to this scale? This requires more than thinking of the Internet as another format. The scale of the Internet requires us to invite machines into our research and publishing activity. Continue reading

Advocacy, Analysis, and the Vital Importance of Discriminating Between Them

As the scholarly communication world becomes more complex and the issues we deal with become more politically and emotionally fraught, it becomes increasingly essential that we be able to tell the difference between anlaysis and advocacy. What markers can we look for to help us discriminate between them? Continue reading

Guest Post: Lettie Conrad on Metadata Promiscuity and the Researcher Experience

The pathways into academic material are diverse and the researcher experiences (RX) are quite variable. How can a publisher best open up its content for discovery? Continue reading

Scholarly Kitchen Podcast: The New Growth Engines

Michael Clarke looks at some of the growth avenues in scholarly communications. Continue reading

The Problem(s) With Credit for Peer Review

Offering researchers credit for performing peer review seems, on the surface, like a good idea. But implementing such a scheme raises some problematic questions. Continue reading

The Manuscript Submission Mess: Brief Notes from a Grumpy Author

Submitting articles for publication is a nightmare–there’s a plethora of platforms and interfaces, and they all seem to be awful. Can anything be done? Continue reading

Connecting to End-Users

Digital media enables us to collect a huge amount of end-user data, far more than we could gather for print publishing. This presentation summarizes the way that data can be used to foster growth and concludes that end-user data is likely to require the creation of a new class of products. Continue reading

Guest Post: CCC’s Roy Kaufman–A Text Mining Primer for Journal Publishers

What is text mining? The CCC’s Roy Kaufman offers a primer for publishers. Continue reading

Guest Post: INASP’s Anne Powell — Availability Does Not Equal Access

INASP’s Anne Powell discusses the complexity of discovery, and the work INASP is doing to bring together tools, technologies, infrastructure and perhaps most importantly, relationships built on an understanding of the needs of users. Continue reading

An Archaeology of Discovery

How valuable is the brand? It depends on the ecosystem or publishing epoch. Brands were the hallmark of the print era, but with the advent of new publishing paradigms, brands now compete with other useful means to identify materials. Continue reading

Grab and Go and the Gravitational Pull of Discovery

A look at Facebook’s Instant Article initiative and what it means for discovery and for publishers. Continue reading

Revisiting: On the Likelihood of Academia “Taking Back” Scholarly Publishing

Revisiting Rick Anderson’s 2013 post on what the options for the academy to take control of scholarly publishing, and whether any of those options seems feasible. Continue reading

The Half-life of Print

Popular discussion of the enduring popularity of print often obfuscate the business issues of managing a company that is transitioning from print to digital. Continue reading

Public Access: Getting Medical Information to Patients

Highlighting efforts by medical publishers to help get information into the hands of patients and caregivers. Continue reading

Emerging from the STM Meeting: 2015 Top Tech Trends

Each sector of the information community is aware of the likelihood that their role in the scholarly ecosystem will change over the next three to five years. Each sector’s perspective is just a bit different. Content providers in the STM world see the future unfolding this way. Continue reading

Ethnography: A Scientist Discovers the Value of the Social Sciences

What do we mean by ethnographic research? In essence we are talking about a rich, multi-factorial descriptive approach. While quantitative research uses pre-existing categories in its analysis, qualitative research is open to new ways of categorizing data. We take a look at how we can use this technique to delve into the subtleties of online user behavior – a must for publishers and societies involved in new product development Continue reading

Side Dishes by Stewart Wills

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The mission of the Society for Scholarly Publishing (SSP) is "[t]o advance scholarly publishing and communication, and the professional development of its members through education, collaboration, and networking." SSP established The Scholarly Kitchen blog in February 2008 to keep SSP members and interested parties aware of new developments in publishing.
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