Ethics

This category contains 231 posts

Instruction Junction — The Ballooning Lists of Editorial Policies, and the Burdens They Create

Long “Instructions to Authors” filled with ancillary policies and undifferentiated requirements don’t help authors, staff, or editors. As the graveyard for unmade decisions, they’ve only gotten longer and more opaque. Maybe it’s time to clean yours up! Continue reading

Interview with Gordon Nelson — Public Access Policies, Open Access, and the Viability of Scientific Societies

An interview with the President of the Council of Scientific Society Presidents, on the unintended and potentially damaging consequences of public and open access mandates and embargoes. Continue reading

Housecleaning at the Directory of Open Access Journals

The DOAJ is kicking out hundreds of predatory and scam publishers that found their way into the directory, and tightening standards to ensure that they don’t sneak back in. Which makes things a bit awkward for a community that, for years, has been insisting that predatory OA publishing isn’t a problem worth worrying about. Continue reading

And the New Maxwell Perkins is . . . Google!

Google recently disclosed that they give Web sites higher ranking if they are encrypted. This is but one example of how Google serves as a gatekeeper of the Internet, making cultural decisions in the name of technological elegance. Continue reading

Your Question for the Day — What Is “Peer Review”?

A recent “Slate” article shows what can go wrong when we talk about “peer review” as if we all share a common definition about an unchanging phenomenon. Continue reading

The Authors Guild Loses (Again), and HathiTrust Wins–But What Does It Mean?

The Authors Guild’s lawsuit against HathiTrust over the latter’s massive library of digitized print books has been dismissed by the Second Circuit Court. What does this mean for libraries, authors, and readers? Continue reading

The 1% of Scientific Outputs — A Story of Strawmen, Sensationalism, and Scopus

A paper claiming to have identified “the 1%” in productive published researchers may suffer from problems with disambiguation, timing, and scope. Continue reading

Trust But Verify — Identity Fraud and Exploitation of the Trust Economy in Scholarly Publishing

A ruse to self-review and self-recommend papers for publication leads to 60 retractions. Can we find a way to prevent this kind of identity fraud and its consequences? Continue reading

Hit the Road — How a Forgettable Paper and a Misguided Publisher Created an Unnecessary Controversy

The censorship scandal at Taylor & Francis has wrapped up, and the lessons are as obvious as you think. Continue reading

Life in a Bubble — The Limitations of Public Access, the Challenges of Public Engagement

Presumptions about the benefits of access fail to take into account the power and difficulty of true engagement with diverse publics. Continue reading

Side Dishes by Stewart Wills

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