This category contains 278 posts

Think. Check. Submit. (How to Have Trust in Your Publisher.)

Charlie Rapple reports on “Think. Check. Submit.”, a campaign to help researchers learn who they can trust when they are seeking to publish their work. Continue reading

Revisiting: The Editor — A Vital Role We Barely Talk About Anymore

Revisiting Kent Anderson’s 2014 post on the importance of editors–how much of what we see as a failure of “peer review” is really a failure of editorial oversight? Continue reading

Validating Author Services Providers: Q&A with Donald Samulack

A proposed coalition aims to help authors identify reputable service providers. In this Q&A with Donald Samulack, the justification and way forward for such an effort is discussed. Continue reading

Amazon and the Future of Work

Amazon was recently criticized harshly in an article in the New York Times. The piece raises the question of whether the hard-charging culture of the tech industry is what we want. Continue reading

Deceptive Publishing: Why We Need a Blacklist, and Some Suggestions on How to Do It Right

Predatory publishing is a big and complex problem; so is calling out and shaming deceptive publishers by means of blacklisting. Is that something we should even do, and can it be done fairly, constructively, and helpfully? Yes, and here are some suggestions how. Continue reading

Elephants and the Internet: Online Forgetting

Should kids be helped to delete evidence of indiscretion, or should they stop posting such evidence in the first place? Charlie Rapple considers the new iRights campaign Continue reading

Advocacy, Analysis, and the Vital Importance of Discriminating Between Them

As the scholarly communication world becomes more complex and the issues we deal with become more politically and emotionally fraught, it becomes increasingly essential that we be able to tell the difference between anlaysis and advocacy. What markers can we look for to help us discriminate between them? Continue reading

Scholarly Kitchen Podcast: Talking Publication Ethics

A conversation with COPE’s Charlotte Haug. Continue reading

Surveillance and the Scholarly World: What Shall We Do With The Database of Intentions?

When we talk about impact and metrics and understanding the customer, we are actually talking about surveillance data. We should have an open debate about what this means. Continue reading

The Mixed Marriage of For-profit and Not-for-profit Publishing

Scholarly publishing is virtually unique in that it has significant representation by both for-profit and not-for-profit publishers. This alters the very nature of this segment of publishing, making the not-for-profits more business-like and forcing the for-profits to behave at times like mission-based organizations. Continue reading

Academia Versus Should Tech Business Needs Trump Scholarly Culture?

Should the fast and loose rules of startup company business models and the spin-oriented language of advertising be given free rein in the scholarly community? Continue reading

Should We Retire the Term “Predatory Publishing”?

Those who argue that “predatory” behavior is not only a problem among author-pays OA publishers have a good point. But this raises another question: is the term “predatory” itself really useful in the context of scholarly communication? Continue reading

Thumbs Down for the Freemium Model? Researchers Reject Nature’s Fast Track Peer Review Experiment

Nature conducts an experiment in paid fast track peer review, and the research community responds with concerns over creating an unfair tiered system for publication. Continue reading

Ask The Chefs: What is Editorial Independence and How Does It Impact Publishing?

On the surface editorial independence seems so straight-forward. However, it is filled with nuance. If publishing and editorial expectations are not clearly set, misunderstandings can cause angst, poor working relationships, and even legal action. Continue reading

The ROARMAP Open Access Registry: New and Greatly Improved

ROARMAP, a deeply flawed and often misleading international registry of open access “mandates,” has now been completely revamped–and the result is a much more informative and reliable resource. Continue reading

Revisiting: The Price of Posting — PubMed Central Spends Most of Its Budget Handling Author Manuscripts

Revisiting Kent Anderson’s post based on his FOIA request documents show that PubMed Central spends most of its money tagging author manuscripts, and that its stricter rules for NIH authors may double its costs. Continue reading

5 Million Public Domain Ebooks in HathiTrust: What Does This Mean?

The HathiTrust archive now contains 5 million digitized books that are in the public domain and are freely available to all. Do we recognize how significant that is? Continue reading

Getting Beyond “Post and Forget” Open Access

Even open access advocates should support the commercialization of materials that are OA, as such commercialization can lead to enhanced discovery of scientific materials. Continue reading

Copyright and Open Textbooks: The Case of Boundless

Boundless Textbooks used to offer free alternatives to popular and expensive college texts, using information available on the open Web. Then came the inevitable lawsuit, and an out-of-court settlement. What does the Boundless program look like now? Continue reading

More Creative Commons Confusion: When Does NC Really Mean “Non-Commercial”?

A recent non-controversy once again shows how much confusion exists around what exactly Creative Commons licenses actually mean. Continue reading

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The mission of the Society for Scholarly Publishing (SSP) is "[t]o advance scholarly publishing and communication, and the professional development of its members through education, collaboration, and networking." SSP established The Scholarly Kitchen blog in February 2008 to keep SSP members and interested parties aware of new developments in publishing.
The Scholarly Kitchen is a moderated and independent blog. Opinions on The Scholarly Kitchen are those of the authors. They are not necessarily those held by the Society for Scholarly Publishing nor by their respective employers.

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