Metrics and Analytics

This category contains 403 posts

Meet the New Economy of Letters, Same As the Old Economy of Letters

Last fall in the New Yorker, Jill Lapore bemoaned the current relationship between intellectuals and the general public, which she feels is “more vexed than ever” — in part because of a system that rewards academics for outrageousness and for lousy writing. Does she have a point? Continue reading

Exhibition Prohibition — Why Shouldn’t Publishers Celebrate an Improved Impact Factor?

A trend toward shaming journals that promote their impact factors needs to be rolled back. Impact factors are journal metrics. It’s the other uses that need to be curtailed. Continue reading

Well, Blow Me Down — A Tale of Spinach, Citations, Nutrition, Epistemology, and Cognitive Ease

More and more studies are emerging showing how misdirecting and expanding citations can lead to long-term misconceptions and mistaken belief systems in the sciences. Continue reading

Ask The Chefs: “What is ‘International’ in Publishing Strategy Today?”

The chefs are asked about international publishing strategy and so are you. Tell us how you’d answer today’s question! Continue reading

Going to the Beach with a Public Intellectual

This year’s beach reading will be spent with books by public intellectuals. Unfortunately, writing for the general public is not valued within the academy, to the detriment of public education. Continue reading

The Mystery of a “Partial” Impact Factor

The lack of an Impact Factor is one reason that new journals have difficulty attracting submissions. Some journals, such as eLife and Cell Reports, qualify for an Impact Factor based on partial data. This post explores how that happens. Continue reading

An Interview with Amy Brand on a Proposed New Contributor Taxonomy Initiative

We’ve got DOIs (digital object identifiers) to help identify research articles, images, and other digital objects, and ORCIDs (Open Researcher and Contributor IDs) to help disambiguate the authors of those objects. Now there’s a new initiative to create a contributor taxonomy that identifies who’s done what in the creation of published research – find out more in our interview with Amy Brand, one of the brains behind the concept. Continue reading

Interview with Thomson Reuters: InCites Platform Offers New Analytics and Transparency

Thomson Reuters launched a new platform called InCites last week. The platform combines Journal Citation Reports with the Essential Science Indicators. In this Q&A, Patricia Brennan from Thomson Reuters describes the new platform and new additions that answer concerns from critics. Continue reading

Is Open Access a Cause or an Effect?

Why can’t researchers agree on whether Open Access is the cause of more citations or merely associated with better performing papers? The answer is in the methods. Continue reading

Stick To Your Ribs: The Impact Factor’s Greatest Hits (and Misses)

Yesterday saw the release of the 2013 Impact Factors for scholarly journals. We present a look back at some favorite posts examining the Impact Factor. Continue reading

Side Dishes by Stewart Wills

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The mission of the Society for Scholarly Publishing (SSP) is "[t]o advance scholarly publishing and communication, and the professional development of its members through education, collaboration, and networking." SSP established The Scholarly Kitchen blog in February 2008 to keep SSP members and interested parties aware of new developments in publishing.
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